Episode 64: Elementary Social Studies with Anne-Lise Halvorsen

In episode 64, Dan and Michael chat about elementary social studies with Michigan State professor Anne-Lise Halvorsen.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. You can find more info about Anne-Lise’s work on her website at annelise.wiki.educ.msu.edu/home.

History of Elementary Social Studies

  1. Halvorsen, A. (2013).  A history of elementary social studies: Romance and reality. New York: Peter Lang. https://www.peterlang.com/view/product/28177
  2. Halvorsen, A. (May-June, 2009). Back to the future: The expanding communities curriculum in geography education. The Social Studies, 100, 115-120. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3200/TSSS.100.3.115-120?journalCode=vtss20

Project-based Learning

  1. Halvorsen, A., Duke, N. K., Brugar, K. A., Block, M. K., Strachan, S. L., Berka, M. B., & Brown, J. M. (2012). Narrowing the achievement gap in second-grade socialstudies and content area literacy: The promise of a project-based approach. Theory and Research in Social Education, 40, 198-229. http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/91282680/narrowing-achievement-gap-second-grade-social-studies-content-area-literacy-promise-project-based-approach
  2. Duke, N. K., Halvorsen, A., & Strachan, S.L. (2016). Project-based learning not just for STEM anymore. Phi Delta Kappan98(1), 14-19.  http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0031721716666047
  3. Duke, N.K., & Halvorsen, A. (2017, June 20). New study shows the impact of PBL on student achievement [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.edutopia.org/article/new-study-shows-impact-pbl-student-achievement-nell-duke-anne-lise-halvorsen 
  4. Halvorsen, A., & Duke, N.K. (2017, June 20). Projects that have been put to the test [Web log post]. https://www.edutopia.org/article/projects-have-been-put-test-anne-lise-halvorsen-nell-duke

Adolescents’ Use of Evidence

  1. Crocco, M., Halvorsen, A., Jacobsen, R., & Segall, A. (2017). Teaching with evidence. Phi Delta Kappan 98(7), 67-71. https://www.pdkmembers.org/members_online/publications/archive/pdf/PDK_98_7/67pdk_98_7.pdf

Contact

Anne-Lise Halvorsen is an associate professor of teacher education, specializing in social studies education, at Michigan State University. Halvorsen’s work focuses on elementary social studies education, the history of education, the integration of social studies and literacy, teacher preparation in the social studies, and students’ historical thinking. She is author of A History of Elementary Social Studies: Romance and Reality (Peter Lang, 2013), and co-author, with Jere Brophy and Janet Alleman, of the third edition of the social studies methods textbook, Powerful Social Studies for Elementary Students (Cengage, 2012). She is a former kindergarten teacher and former curriculum writer for the state of Michigan. You can find more on her website and e-mail her atannelise@msu.edu.

Episode 63: Civics Simulations in the Classroom with Jane Lo

In episode 63, Michael & Dan discuss a project-based learning approach to government class – using simulations – with Jane Lo. Jane’s article “Adolescents Developing Civic Identities: Sociocultural Perspectives on Simulations and Role-Play in a Civic Classroom” was recently published by Theory & Research in Social Education.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Lo, J. C. (2017).Adolescents Developing Civic Identities: Sociocultural Perspectives on Simulations and Role-Play in a Civic Classroom. Theory & Research in Social Education, 45(2), 189 – 217.
  2. Check out the Knowledge In Action website for yourself!
  3.  Parker, W. C. , Lo, J. C. (2016). Reinventing the High School Government Course: Rigor, Simulations, and Learning from TextDemocracy and Education, 24 (1), Article 6.
  4. Parker, W. C. , Lo, J. C. (2016). “Give Us Your Best Advice”: Assessing Deep Political Learning. Social Education, 80 (4), 227 – 231.
  5. Jane was part of a webinar for Edweek to discuss this project – check it out here!

Contact

Jane C. Lo is Assistant Professor of Social Science Education in the School of Teacher Education at Florida State University. Her research focuses on the political engagement of youth, social studies curriculum development, and developing measures of deep learning and collaboration. Her methodological expertise includes mixed-methods designs, design-based implementation research, interview and survey methods, and advanced correlational techniques. She teaches courses in social studies methods. To contact her, go here!

Episode 61: Civic Education and Bridging the Partisan Divide with Chris Clark

In Episode 61, Michael & Dan chat with Chris Clark about his recent Theory & Research in Social Studies article “Examining the Relationship Between Civic Education and Partisan Alignment in Young Voters.” Our conversation includes a discussion of building an open classroom environment AND how pizza should not be defined by tomato sauce.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Clark C. W. (2017).Examining the Relationship Between Civic Education and Partisan Alignment in Young Voters Theory & Research in Social Education, 45(2), 218 – 247.
  2. Clark C. W.  & Avery P.G. (2016) The Psychology of Controversial Issues’ Discussions: Challenges and Opportunities in a Polarized, Post-9/11 Society. In W. Journell’s, Reassessing the social studies curriculum: Promoting critical civic engagement in a politically polarized, post-9/11 world (pp. 109 – 119). Mitchellville, MD: Rowman & Littlefield
  3. Chris recently added an Adademia.edu profile! You can follow along his academic journey there!

Contact

Chris Clark recently graduated with a PhD in Curriculum & Instruction from the University of Minnesota. He will be starting a job teaching future social studies teachers at the University of Georgia in the Fall of 2017. Prior to academia, he taught high school social studies (US History, Current Events, Psychology, & Philosophy) for six years. His current research focus is on student political identity and how that influences learning and behavior in the classroom. You can reach him via email or on his brand new Twitter account!

Episode 60: Professional Development in the Age of Accountability with Kevin Meuwissen

In Episode 60, Michael & Dan chat with Kevin Meuwissen about his recent Theory & Research in Social Studies article “Happy Professional Development at an Unhappy Time”: Learning to Teach for Historical Thinking in a High-Pressure Accountability Context.

meuwissen.jpg

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Meuwissen, K. W. (2017). “Happy Professional Development at an Unhappy Time”: Learning to Teach for Historical Thinking in a High-Pressure Accountability Context. Theory & Research in Social Education, 45(2), 248 – 285.
  2. Meuwissen, K. W. (2013). Readin’, Writin’, Ready for Testin’? Adaptive Assessment in Elective and Standardized-Tested Social Studies Course Contexts. Theory & Research in Social Education, 41(3), 285 – 315.
  3. Meuwissen, K. W. (2013). Teachers are Political Actors. What Does This Mean for Teacher Education? [Blog Post].  Retrieved from Warner Perspectives 
  4. You can find his articles for the Huffington Post by clicking here!

Contact

Kevin Meuwissen is a professor of Teaching & Curriculum at the Warner School at the University of Rochester where he directs the social studies teacher preparation program. His teaching and research focus on helping secondary social studies teachers develop a deliberative stance toward curriculum, instruction, and the political institution of schooling as they interact with diverse influences on their pedagogical decisions. In addition to being an expert in his field, he is a dapper dresser. You can email him at kmeuwissen@warner.rochester.edu. Check out his university webpage for more!

Episode 59: Heritage Narratives with Sara Levy

sara-levy

In episode 59, Dan and Michael talk with Sara Levy about teaching heritage narratives.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Levy, S. A. (2017). How Students Navigate the Construction of Heritage Narratives. Theory & Research in Social Education, 45(2), 157-188.
  2. Levy, S. A. (2014). Heritage, history, and identity. Teachers College Record, 116(6), 1-17.
  3. And here’s a video of Dr. Levy talking about her article inTeachers College Record:

https://vialogues.com/videos/embedded/21195

Contact

Sara A. Levy, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Education at Wells College in Aurora, New York. Her research focuses on teaching and learning in public school history classrooms around global historical events with which students have heritage connections. You can tweet her @ProfSlevy or e-mail her at slevy@wells.edu.

Episode 58: Learning History Outside the Classroom with Lisa Gilbert

In episode 58, Michael & Dan chat with Lisa Gilbert about her Theory & Research in Social Studies media review of Assassins Creed, her background in Museum Studies, and finding history outside the classroom!

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Assassins

Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Gilbert, L. (2017). “The Past is Your Playground”: The Challenges and Possibilities ofAssassin’s Creed: Syndicate for Social Education. Theory & Research in Social Education, 45(1), 145 – 155.
  2. Gilbert, L. (2015). Can we control what students learn on museum visits [Blog Post]. Retrieved from museumquestions.com/2015/04/06/can-we-control-what-students-learn-on-museum-visits/.
  3. Gilbert, L. (2015). Help students make the most of their visit to the museum. nche.net/pages/history-matters/may-2014-gilbert
  4. Gilbert, L. (2016). Valuing Critical Inquiry Skills in Museum Literacy. Social Studies Research and Practice, 11(3), 51 – 66 http://www.socstrpr.org/?page_id=3424
  5. Gilbert, L. (2016). “Loving, Knowing Ignorance”: A Problem for the Educational Mission of Museums. Curator, 59: 125–140. doi:10.1111/cura.12153.

Contact

Lisa Gilbert recently earned her Ph.D. in Education from Saint Louis University.  Her research focus is on the relevance of public history for social studies education. This fall, she’ll be starting as an Instructor of Social Studies at Thomas Jefferson School. You can follow her on Twitter at @GilbertLisaK and you can see how she live-tweets museums by checking out her Twitter Moments!

Episode 55: Teaching Mexican-American Histories with Maribel Santiago

In Episode 55, Michael & Dan chat with Dr. Maribel Santiago about the importance of teaching Mexican-American histories, particularly the Mendez v. Westminster case regarding school segregation

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Here is Dr. Maribel Santiago’s TRSE article!
    1. Santiago, M. (2017). Erasing differences for the sake of inclusion: How Mexican/Mexican American students construct historical narratives. Theory & Research in Social Education, 45(1), 43-74.
  2. Here is the blog post that Maribel Santiago wrote about how to use the case in the classroom. JTE Insider:  70th Anniversary-Mendez v. Westminster
  3. Book Chapter:  The color of America has changed: How racial diversity shaped civil rights reform in California, 1941-1978
  4. Children’s Book:  Separate is never equal : Sylvia Mendez & her family’s fight for desegregation
  5. Latinx History:
    Book:  Latino education in the United States : a narrated history from 1513-2000
  6. Book:  500 años del pueblo chicano/500 years of Chicano history in pictures
  7. Book:  500 years of Chicana women’s history/500 años de historia de las chicanas
  8. Puerto Rico Syllabus
  9. Documentary Series:  Chicano!
    Quest for a Homeland
  10. Some of the YouTube videos that Maribel Santiago suggested:
    1. Struggle in the Fields
    2. Taking Back the Schools
    3. Fighting for Political Power
    4. Mitú
  11. Fusion TV

Contact

Maribel Santiago is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Teacher Education at Michigan State University.  She also holds an appointment in the Department of History.  After obtaining a dual B.A. in History and Chicana/o Studies, and a M.Ed. from UCLA, Dr. Santiago taught high school social studies in Watts, a neighborhood of Los Angeles.  She also earned an M.A. in History and a Ph.D. in Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education, both from Stanford University. Reach out to her on Twitter and check out her website for more!

Episode 54: Students’ Historical Perspective Taking With Tim Huijgen

In Episode 54, Michael & Dan chat with Tim Huijgen about his recent Theory & Research in Social Education article that focused on getting students to take on historical perspectives.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Check out his TRSE article – Toward Historical Perspective Taking: Students’ Reasoning When Contextualizing the Actions of People in the Past!
  2. Tim’s personal website (with all published articles): http://www.rug.nl/staff/t.d.huijgen/research
  3. Open access article about the construction of an observation instrument: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10212-016-0295-8
  4. Open access article about measuring students’ ability to perform historical perspective taking:https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10212-014-0219-4
  5. Open access article written bij Jannet van Drie and Carla van Boxtel about historical reasoning: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10648-007-9056-1

Contact

T.D [Tim] Huijgen is a teacher and a teacher educator in the Netherlands. He comes from a family of educators and was recently published in Theory & Research in Social Education! Check out his university website and you are clicks away to reading all if his work!

Episode 53: Teaching Difficult Knowledge with Jim Garrett

In episode 53, Michael and Dan discuss teaching difficult knowledge with Jim Garrett. One of the first things that we do is discuss what, exactly is difficult knowledge.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Check out Jim’s new book!
    1. Garrett, H.J. (2017) Learning to be in the World with Others: Difficult Knowledge and Social Studies Education. New York, NY: Peter Lang Publishing.

  2. Wondering about people’s resistance to facts (that Jim referenced), check out:
    1. Alcorn, M. (2013). Resistance to learning: Overcoming the desire not to know in classroom teaching. New York, NY: Palgrave MacMillan.
  3. Want to learn more even more political science? Check out:
    1. Flynn, D. J., Nyhan, B., & Reifler, J. (2017). The nature and origins of misperceptions: Understanding false and unsupported beliefs about politics. Political Psychology38(S1), 127-150
    2. Nyhan, B., & Reifler, J. (2010). When corrections fail: The persistence of political misperceptions. Political Behavior32(2), 303-330.
  4. To learn more about difficult knowledge, check out:
    1.  Britzman, D. P. (1998). “That lonely discovery”: Anne Frank, Anna Freud, and the question of pedagogy. Lost subject, contested objects: Toward a psychoanalytic inquiry of learning. Albany, NY: SUNY Press.
    2. Britzman, D. P. (2000b). If the story cannot end: Deferred action, ambivalence, and difficult knowledge. In R. I. Simon, C. Eppert, & S. Rosenberg (Eds.),
    3. Between hope and despair: Pedagogy and the remembrance of historical trauma (pp. 27–58). Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.
    4. Pitt, A., & Britzman, D. (2003). Speculations on qualities of difficult knowledge in teaching and learning: An experiment in psychoanalytic research. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 16(6), 755–776.
    5. Simon, R. I. (2014). A pedagogy of witnessing: Curatorial practice and the pursuit of social justice. Albany, NY: SUNY Press
  5. Want to read Jim’s article he wrote for Theory & Research in Social Education? Check out:
    1. Garrett, H. J. (2011). The routing and re-routing of difficult knowledge: Social studies teachers encounter When the Levees Broke.  Theory & Research in Social Education39(3), 320-347.
  6. Some articles/books about Discussion  & Controversial Issues:
    1. Hess, D. E., & McAvoy, P. (2014). The political classroom: Evidence and ethics in democratic education. New York, NY: Routledge.
    2. Hess, D. E. (2009). Controversy in the classroom: The democratic power of discussion. New York, NY: Routledge
    3. Parker, W. C., & Hess, D. (2001). Teaching with and for discussion. Teaching and teacher education17(3), 273-289

Contact

H. Jim Garret is an education professor at the University of Georgia. You can contact Jim on Twitter @HJamesGarrett or check out his website at the University of Georgia. Also, check out his new book!

Episode 52: Social Studies Research with TRSE editor Wayne Journell

In episode 52, Dan and Michael talk with Theory and Research in Social Education (TRSE) editor Wayne Journell and announce a partnership!

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. You can learn more about TRSE on the National Council for the Social Studies site: http://www.socialstudies.org/publications/theoryandresearch
  2. You can find current TRSE articles on the Taylor & Francis site: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/utrs20/current
  3. Read Wayne’s “From the Editor” note to begin his tenure as TRSE editor in 2017: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00933104.2016.1272328
  4. If you’re really bored, you can read Dan’s article with lead author Neil Houser and colleagues on how social studies teachers in Oklahoma deal with accountability-reform… it mentions Foucault: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00933104.2016.1213213

Contact

Wayne Journell is an education professor at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. You can contact Wayne on Twitter @UNCGSocStudies or check out his website where you are steps away to reading more of his work.