Episode 78: Teaching for Gender Equity in Social Studies with Mardi Schmeichel

In episode 78, Dan and Michael chat with Mardi Schmeichel about gender equity in the social studies, including her 2015 article published Theory and Research in Social Education titled, “Skirting around critical feminist rationales for teaching women in social studies.”

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Mardi Schmeichel

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Episode 76: Teaching Asian-American Histories with Noreen Naseem Rodriguez

In episode 76, Dan and Michael chat with Noreen Naseem Rodriguez about teaching Asian-American histories and her new Social Studies and the Young Learner article, “But They Didn’t Do Nothin’ Wrong!”: Teaching about Japanese-American Incarceration.

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Noreen

VIEW EPISODE 76 TRANSCRIPT HERE

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Episode 75: Evil and Villainification in Social Studies with Cathryn van Kessel & Ryan Crowley

In episode 75, Michael & Dan chat with Cathryn van Kessel and Ryan M. Crowley about their recently published Theory and Research in Social Education article “Villainification and Evil in Social Studies Education. One of the big highlights is how to make ‘historical villains’ more three dimensional.

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Villainification.jpg

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Episode 74: Civic Online Reasoning with Sarah McGrew

In episode 74, Dan and Michael chat with Sarah McGrew of the Stanford History Education Group (SHEG about civic online reasoning, their new research published in TRSE, and how teachers can use the assessments.

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McGrew_1

Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. McGrew, S., Breakstone, J., Ortega, T., Smith, M. & Wineburg, S. (in press). Can students evaluate online sources?: Learning from assessments of civic online reasoning. Theory & Research in Social Education. Advance online publication. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00933104.2017.1416320
  2. Check out all the SHEG Civic Online Reasoning competencies and assessments: https://sheg.stanford.edu/civic-online-reasoning (requires login, but all materials are free!)
  3. “Why Students Can’t Google Their Way to the Truth: Fact-checkers and students approach websites differently” by Sam Wineburg and Sarah McGrew in EdWeek (11/01/16)
  4. The Challenge That’s Bigger Than Fake News: Civic Reasoning in a Social Media Environment” by Sarah McGrew, Teresa Ortega, Joel Breakstone, & Sam Wineburg in AFT.org
  5. Here’s an article that was written by a teacher collaborator: “Real Teaching in an Era of Fake News” by Will Colglazier in AFT.org.
  6. Wineburg, S. & McGrew, S. (2017, October 9). Lateral Reading: Reading Less and Learning More When Evaluating Digital Information. Stanford History Education Group Working Paper No. 2017-A1 (56 pages). 

     

Contact

Sarah McGrew co-directs SHEG’s Civic Online Reasoning project. She grew up in Michigan and earned a B.A. in Political Science and Education from Swarthmore College before completing the Stanford Teacher Education Program. After STEP, she taught world history in Washington, D.C., for five years. Sarah is now a doctoral student in the Stanford Graduate School of Education. She previously taught in STEP. In her free time, she enjoys swimming, baking, and exploring the West Coast.

Bio from https://sheg.stanford.edu/about/people

Episode 72: Compelling Questions with Rebecca Mueller

In episode 72, Dan and Michael ask lots of compelling questions to Rebecca Mueller about her work on using compelling questions in the classroom.

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Upstate Headshot

Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Mueller, R. G. W. (2017). Calibrating your “compelling compass”: Teacher-constructed prompts to assist question development. Social Education, 81(6), 343-345.
  2. Mueller, R. G. W. (in press). Examining teachers’ development and implementation of compelling questions. Social Studies Research and Practice, 13(1).

  3. Mueller, R. G. W. (2017). From potential to practice: Compelling questions as an impetus for curricular and instructional change. Journal of Social Studies Research. doi:10.1016/j.jssr.2017.08.003i

  4. Mueller, R. G. W. (2016). Making them fit: Examining teacher support for student questioning. Social Studies Research and Practice, 11(1), 40-55.

  5. And don’t forget to check out the C3 Teachers site and Episode 10: C3 Frameworks for Social Studies with Kathy Swan!

Contact

Rebecca Mueller is Assistant Professor of Social Studies Education at University of South Carolina Upstate. Her research focuses on social studies teachers’ use of inquiry and questioning. You can contact her at rmuelle2@uscupstate.edu or @rgw_mueller on Twitter, which might encourage her to actually use her Twitter account.

Episode 66: Teaching Geography with Chris Heffernan

In episode 66, Dan and Michael talk with middle school world geography teacher and #WorldGeoChat moderator Chris Heffernan about teaching geography.

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ChrisHeffernan

Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Check out the #WorldGeoChat moderated chats on Twitter on Tuesday nights at 9pm EST/8pm CST or join the conversation 24/7 using the hashtag
  2. You can find the #WorldGeoChat blog at WorldGeoChat.wordpress.com
  3. “The Power of a PLN” from the #WorldGeoChat squad  for National Geographic: https://blog.education.nationalgeographic.com/2017/08/24/the-power-of-a-pln/
  4. Chris has written a number of helpful blog posts, including:
    1. Stop making students memorize maps!
    2. 3 ways to add geography to your classroom
    3. You don’t need to teach geography to be a global educator
    4. 3 things we could do tomorrow to make Americans geoliterate
    5. Why geography matters now more than ever
    6. Geography to save the world
  5. Check out the National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE) and their conference at ncge.org
  6. Check out Google Earth; Google My Maps; Google Expeditions
  7. Blog posts from #WorldGeoChat moderator Pete Spiegal on Google Maps:
    1. New Google Earth basics
    2. New Online Google Earth tutorial: Part II
    3. New Online Google Earth Tutorial: Part III
  8. Planet Money T-Shirt Project NPR story, series, videos (intro, part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4, part 5, all) and Lesson Plan
  9. 99% Invisible podcast episode on shipping containers: http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/reefer-madness/
  10. Chris has his students plot out 10 countries and physical features in a region on satellite view to understand and do a See-Think-Wonder: What do you see? What do think about what you see? What do you wonder about what you see?
  11. Check out the UN Sustainable Development Goals: GlobalGoals.org

Contact

Chris Heffernan teaches 7th-grade world geography at Jefferson Junior High School in Naperville, Illinois, and is starting his seventeenth year there. He loves maps, but hates when students are forced to memorize them. Chris has focused his course on having students appreciate the different ways that people around the world are influenced by physical systems. He is passionate about water issues and strives to have his students take action to solve problems ranging from issues at school to the global water crisis. He can be found on Twitter @cheffernan75 and through the #worldgeochat blog (worldgeochat.wordpress.com).

Episode 64: Elementary Social Studies with Anne-Lise Halvorsen

In episode 64, Dan and Michael chat about elementary social studies with Michigan State professor Anne-Lise Halvorsen.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. You can find more info about Anne-Lise’s work on her website at annelise.wiki.educ.msu.edu/home.

History of Elementary Social Studies

  1. Halvorsen, A. (2013).  A history of elementary social studies: Romance and reality. New York: Peter Lang. https://www.peterlang.com/view/product/28177
  2. Halvorsen, A. (May-June, 2009). Back to the future: The expanding communities curriculum in geography education. The Social Studies, 100, 115-120. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3200/TSSS.100.3.115-120?journalCode=vtss20

Project-based Learning

  1. Halvorsen, A., Duke, N. K., Brugar, K. A., Block, M. K., Strachan, S. L., Berka, M. B., & Brown, J. M. (2012). Narrowing the achievement gap in second-grade socialstudies and content area literacy: The promise of a project-based approach. Theory and Research in Social Education, 40, 198-229. http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/91282680/narrowing-achievement-gap-second-grade-social-studies-content-area-literacy-promise-project-based-approach
  2. Duke, N. K., Halvorsen, A., & Strachan, S.L. (2016). Project-based learning not just for STEM anymore. Phi Delta Kappan98(1), 14-19.  http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0031721716666047
  3. Duke, N.K., & Halvorsen, A. (2017, June 20). New study shows the impact of PBL on student achievement [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.edutopia.org/article/new-study-shows-impact-pbl-student-achievement-nell-duke-anne-lise-halvorsen 
  4. Halvorsen, A., & Duke, N.K. (2017, June 20). Projects that have been put to the test [Web log post]. https://www.edutopia.org/article/projects-have-been-put-test-anne-lise-halvorsen-nell-duke

Adolescents’ Use of Evidence

  1. Crocco, M., Halvorsen, A., Jacobsen, R., & Segall, A. (2017). Teaching with evidence. Phi Delta Kappan 98(7), 67-71. https://www.pdkmembers.org/members_online/publications/archive/pdf/PDK_98_7/67pdk_98_7.pdf

Drawing Maps

  1. Here’s the link from #sschat co-moderator we mentioned: Quiz: See How Well You Can Draw All 50 States via TIME

Contact

Anne-Lise Halvorsen is an associate professor of teacher education, specializing in social studies education, at Michigan State University. Halvorsen’s work focuses on elementary social studies education, the history of education, the integration of social studies and literacy, teacher preparation in the social studies, and students’ historical thinking. She is author of A History of Elementary Social Studies: Romance and Reality (Peter Lang, 2013), and co-author, with Jere Brophy and Janet Alleman, of the third edition of the social studies methods textbook, Powerful Social Studies for Elementary Students (Cengage, 2012). She is a former kindergarten teacher and former curriculum writer for the state of Michigan. You can find more on her website and e-mail her atannelise@msu.edu.

Episode 63: Civics Simulations in the Classroom with Jane Lo

In episode 63, Michael & Dan discuss a project-based learning approach to government class – using simulations – with Jane Lo. Jane’s article “Adolescents Developing Civic Identities: Sociocultural Perspectives on Simulations and Role-Play in a Civic Classroom” was recently published by Theory & Research in Social Education.

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Episode 61: Civic Education and Bridging the Partisan Divide with Chris Clark

In Episode 61, Michael & Dan chat with Chris Clark about his recent Theory & Research in Social Studies article “Examining the Relationship Between Civic Education and Partisan Alignment in Young Voters.” Our conversation includes a discussion of building an open classroom environment AND how pizza should not be defined by tomato sauce.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Clark C. W. (2017).Examining the Relationship Between Civic Education and Partisan Alignment in Young Voters Theory & Research in Social Education, 45(2), 218 – 247.
  2. Clark C. W.  & Avery P.G. (2016) The Psychology of Controversial Issues’ Discussions: Challenges and Opportunities in a Polarized, Post-9/11 Society. In W. Journell’s, Reassessing the social studies curriculum: Promoting critical civic engagement in a politically polarized, post-9/11 world (pp. 109 – 119). Mitchellville, MD: Rowman & Littlefield
  3. Chris recently added an Adademia.edu profile! You can follow along his academic journey there!

Contact

Chris Clark recently graduated with a PhD in Curriculum & Instruction from the University of Minnesota. He will be starting a job teaching future social studies teachers at the University of Georgia in the Fall of 2017. Prior to academia, he taught high school social studies (US History, Current Events, Psychology, & Philosophy) for six years. His current research focus is on student political identity and how that influences learning and behavior in the classroom. You can reach him via email or on his brand new Twitter account!