Episode 40: The Social Studies Wars with Ron Evans

In episode 40, Dan and Michael interview Ron Evans of San Diego State University on the history of the social studies.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Evans, R. W. (2004). The social studies wars: What should we teach the children?. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.
  2. For more on the issues-centered approach in the social studies see: Evans, R. W., & Saxe, D. W. (1996). Handbook on Teaching Social Issues. NCSS Bulletin 93. National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS).
  3. Hertzberg, H. W. (1981). Social Studies Reform 1880-1980. Boulder, CO: SSEC Publications.
  4. The 1892 report Ron mentioned is the National Education Association’s “History Ten” (part of NEA’s “Committee of Ten”) chaired by Charles Kendall Adams which also included Woodrow Wilson, James Harvey Robinson and others. It was published in 1894.
  5. The American Historical Association’s (AHA) Committee of Seven met in 1899 and was similar to the History Ten, but pushed traditional history movement into secondary schools. It was much more highly adopted and recommended “four blocks” of history instruction: ancient, medieval, modern, and American. It sought to train students in the art of thinking historically
  6. In 1916, the NEA’s Committee on the Social Studies (part of NEA’s Commission on the Reorganization of Secondary Education) met and was headed by Sociologist Jesse James; It recommended a compromise between history and issues-centered social studies with the Problems of Democracy Course (POD) best representing the latter.
  7. Evans, R. W. (2007). This happened in America: Harold Rugg and the censure of social studies. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Press.
  8. The Council for Basic Education that Authur Bestor helped to found closed its doors in 2004 due to lack of funding.
  9. Jerome Bruner’s most influential work is his 1960 book, The process of education.
  10. Wikipedia has a short summary of Man: A Course of Study (MACOS), the Education Development Center maintains MACOSonline.org, and there’s even a documentary film about MACOS called “Through These Eyes“.
  11. Oliver, D. W., & Shaver, J. P. (1966). Teaching public issues in the high school. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin.
  12. Writings helped lead to reform and included Rudolf Flesch’s 1955 book Why Johnny Can’t Read and then eventually accountability-reform with the National Commission on Education’s “A Nationa at Risk” report.
  13. Evans, R. W. (2014). Schooling corporate citizens: How accountability reform has damaged civic education and undermined democracy. New York, NY: Routledge.
  14. See Episode 36 for more on David Berliner’s contention that the American educational crisis is simply a “Manufactured Crisis”
  15. You can learn more about the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) for social studies teachers and the university-level social studies organization College and University Faculty Assembly (CUFA).

Contact 

Ron Evans is a leading authority on social studies and curriculum history. He is a Professor in the School of Teacher Education at San Diego State University. You can find more info about him and his work on his site RonaldWEvans.wordpress.com, buy his books on his Amazon author page, and you can friend him on Facebook for more updates.

Episode 35: Media Literacy & Fake News with Renee Hobbs and Annie Jansen

In episode 35, Michael and Dan chat with past guest Renee Hobbs and AP Government teacher Annie Jansen about Media Literacy and fake news.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Renee Hobbs is the Director of the the Media Education Lab (mediaeducationlab.com) which advances the practice of media literacy education through scholarship and community services. At the website, you can find multimedia curriculum resources, F2F and fully online professional development, and published research that examines the impact of digital and media literacy education.
  2. Renee’s “Credible or Incredible” lesson plan is available as a PDF, part of Assignment: Media Literacy, a comprehensive K-12 curriculum on media literacy developed by Renee Hobbs for the Maryland State Department of Education with support from Discovery Communications: http://mediaeducationlab.com/secondary-school-unit-2-who-do-you-trust; Here’s the link to the PDF that’s at the top right hand corner of the screen: http://mediaeducationlab.com/sites/mediaeducationlab.com/files/AML_H_unit2.pdf
  3. Check out an NPR interview with Professor Sam Wineburg from Stanford University  about his study about students and fake news.
  4. Renne Hobbs is no stranger to Visions of Education! Check out Episode 7: Propaganda with Renee Hobbs!
  5. Annie recommends the following sites:
    1. Fake or Real? How to self check the news and get the facts by Wynne Davis (NPR): http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2016/12/05/503581220/fake-or-real-how-to-self-check-the-news-and-get-the-facts (Scholarly Article)
    2. Critical Media Literacy is Not and Option By Douglas Kellner and Jeff Share (UCLA) https://pages.gseis.ucla.edu/faculty/kellner/essays/2007_Kellner-Share_CML-is-not-Option.pdf (Scholarly Article)
    3. Transforming Teaching and Learning Through Critical Media Literacy Pedagogy: http://www.learninglandscapes.ca/images/documents/ll-no12/garcia.pdf (Scholarly Article)
    4. Online module Annie and Nate Bowling are using for her media unit: https://tps10-my.sharepoint.com/personal/ngibbs_tacoma_k12_wa_us/_layouts/15/WopiFrame.aspx?guestaccesstoken=9x5NuyCIH%2bx%2fGfwhWFo5%2bO5R%2fzG%2bRhNfVzahwb%2bAA78%3d&folderid=0b245acca13d64f2e902d7c3cfc9960e6&action=view

Contact 

Renee Hobbs is Professor of Communication Studies and Director of the Media Education Lab at the University of Rhode Island.  You can contact her on Twitter @reneehobbs or check out her website… you’ll become more media literate just from visiting it.

Annie Jansen teaches AP Government and Politics in the state of Washington. You can contact her on Twitter!

Episode 32: A Reflection on the 2016 Presidential Election with Nate Bowling & Chris Hitchcock

In a free-ranging panel discussion about how the Presidential election 0f 2016 has impacted their classrooms, Michael and Dan are joined by former guest Nate Bowling and upcoming guest Chris Hitchcock.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Check out episode 26 where we chat with Nate about school equity and resources.
  2. Check out episode 33 (upcoming) with guest Chris Hitchcock!
  3. Nate’s approach to helping his students digest the 2016 election was recently highlighted by King 5 (an NBC affiliate).
  4. Nate was also featured on his local NPR station discussing the impact of the election.
  5. Want to learn about Nate’s approach to teaching government? Check out this piece from KUOW.org!
  6. You can find more about Nate’s work on his site: http://www.natebowling.com/

Contact

Nate Bowling currently teaches AP Government and Human Geography at Lincoln High in the Tacoma School District in Washington state. You can contact him on Twitter at @Nate_Bowling.

Chris Hitchcock teaches world history at an online school. She is also a co-moderator of #sschat, a social studies focused Twitter group. And she was also recently awarded with the Jacobs Educator Award for her contributions to integrating technology with classroom learning. She will probably blush because we put this here. You can contact her via Twitter at @CHitch94.

Episode 25: Stanford History Education Group (SHEG) with Joel Breakstone

In episode 25, Michael and Dan discuss the Stanford History Education Group (SHEG) with their director Joel Breakstone.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. SHEG website: https://sheg.stanford.edu/
  2. SHEG Beyond the Bubble assessment website: http://beyondthebubble.stanford.edu/
  3. SHEG’s Historical Thinking Matters website: http://historicalthinkingmatters.org/
  4. You can find magazine articles, research articles, and books about the research SHEG has done on their website, including the article Joel discussed in the podcast:
    1. Reisman, A. (2012). Reading Like a Historian: A document-based history curriculum intervention in urban high schoolsCognition and Instruction, 33(1), 86-112.

Contact

Joel Breakstone directs the Stanford History Education Group. He received his Ph.D. from the Stanford Graduate School of Education. Along with Mark Smith and Sam Wineburg, he led the development of SHEG’s assessment website, Beyond the Bubble. He received the Larry Metcalf Exemplary Dissertation Award from the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) in 2014. He holds a B.A. in history from Brown University and a M.A. in Liberal Studies from Dartmouth College. After graduating college, he taught high school history in Thetford, Vermont, for six years. His research focuses on how teachers use assessment data to inform instruction (Bio on SHEG website). You can find him on Twitter @joelbreakstone.

Episode 21: Gender and education with Kathryn Engebretson

In episode 21, Dan and Michael talk with Kathryn Engebretson about gender and education.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. The first chapter of Dana Goldstein’s 2014 book The Teacher Wars details the views of Horace Mann and Catharine Beecher on gender in the early common schools movement.
  2. The Declaration of Sentiments” (1848)
  3. Here is a good, short article that defines terminology along the gender spectrum: Kilman, C. (2013). The gender spectrum. Teaching Tolerance (44). Retrieved from  http://www.tolerance.org/gender-spectrum
  4. Wikipedia page on the Bechdel Test for movies: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bechdel_test
  5. Engebretson, K. E. (2014). Another Missed Opportunity: Gender in the National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies. Social Studies Research and Practice, 9(3), 21-34.

Contact

Kathryn Engebretson is an assistant professor of Curriculum and Instruction at Indiana University Bloomington. You can learn more about her work on her university page and you can tweet at her @engebretsonk.

 

Episode 15: Indigenous (Mis)Representations in U.S. History with Sarah Shear

In episode 15, Michael and Dan talk with Sarah Shear about Indigenous (Mis)Representations in U.S. History.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Here is a link to everything that Sarah Shear has written!  
  2. Zinn, H. (1980) A People’s History of America. New York: HarperCollins Publishers.
  3. Loewen, J. W. (1995). Lies my teacher told me: Everything your American history textbook got wrong. New York: New Press.
  4. Shear, S.B., Knowles, R.T., Soden, G., & Castro, A.J. (2015). Manifesting destiny: Re/presentations of Indigenous people in K-12 U.S. history curriculum. Theory & Research in Social Education, 43(1), 68-101.
  5. The quote Michael cited was “The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.”It was written by British novelist L.P. Hartley and opens his 1953 novel The Go-Between. There is also a movie.
  6. Dunbar-OrtizR., Gilio-Whitaker, D. (Upcoming). “All the Real Indians Died Off”: And 20 other myths about Native Americans. Boston, MA: Beacon Press.
  7. Dunbar-OrtizR. (2015). An indigenous people’s history to the United States: ReVisioning American history. Boston, MA: Beacon Press.
  8. The National Museum of the American Indian – Sarah mentioned this as a great resource with curricular materials
  9. Stanford History Education Group (SHEG). Battle of Little Bighorn lesson.
  10. Visions of Education Episode 10: C3 Frameworks with Kathy Swan

Contact

Sarah Shear is Assistant Professor of Social Studies Education at Penn State Altoona (which is fun to say…Altoona!). She can be contacted via email  – sbs5180@psu.edu – or you can follow (and chat with) on twitter – @SbShear!

Episode 12: Using Films Effectively with Jeremy Stoddard

In episode 12, Michael and Dan interview Jeremy Stoddard about effectively using film in the classroom (and talk about Godzilla).

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. You can find a list of Jeremy’s pubs HERE and his open access publications HERE.
  2. This article provides a fantastic and brief introduction to teaching effectively with film: Stoddard, J. (2014). Teaching thoughtfully with and about film. Social Education, 78(5), 220-224.
  3. Jeremy references this study: Marcus, A. S., & Stoddard, J. D. (2007). Tinsel town as teacher: Hollywood film in the high school classroom. The History Teacher, 40(3), 303-330.
  4. A great book on using film: Marcus, A., Metzger, S., Paxton, R., and Stoddard, J. (2010). Teaching history with film: Strategies for secondary social studies. New York: Routledge.
  5. Jeremy’s newest book should be out next year!: Stoddard, J., Marcus, A., and Hicks, D. (Eds.) (forthcoming, 2017). Teaching Difficult History through Film. New York: Routledge.
  6. Hobbs, R. (2006). Non‐optimal Uses of Video in the ClassroomLearning, Media and Technology31(1), 35-50.

Contact

Jeremy Stoddard is an Associate Professor of Education and Associated faculty in the  film and media studies program at the College of William & Mary. You can follow Jeremy on Twitter @Jeremy_Stoddard, find more of his research on his ResearchGate or his sites listed above, and learn more about his work on his William & Mary site.

Episode 11: Rethinking Black History with LaGarrett King

In episode 11, Dan and Michael interview LaGarrett King about Rethinking Black History.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. There are a number of books on the Tulsa Race Riots and Dan recommends the following: Hirsch, J. S. (2003). Riot and remembrance: The Tulsa race war and its legacy. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.
  2. King, L. J., & Womac, P. (2014). A Bundle of silences: Examining the racial representation of Black founding fathers of the United States through Glenn Beck’s founders’ Fridays. Theory & Research in Social Education, 42(1), 35-64.
  3. For more on Carter G. Woodson, see LaGarrett’s article: King, L. J., Crowley, R. M., & Brown, A. L. (2010). The forgotten legacy of Carter G. Woodson: Contributions to multicultural social studies and African American history. The Social Studies, 101(5), 211-215.
  4. bell hooks talks about her experiences as a student in segregated and integrated schools in the “Introduction” of her book, Teaching to transgress: Education as the practice of freedom.
  5. Dan recommends “The Problem We All Live With” podcast episode from This American Life to consider contemporary issues of segregation and integration.
  6. Michael recommends this lesson for teaching about women’s roles in the Civil Rights movement from The Choices Program lesson, “Freedom Now: The Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi.”

Contact

LaGarrett King is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Learning, Teaching, & Curriculum at the University of Missouri – Columbia. You can follow LaGarrett on Twitter @DrLaGarrettKing and find more of his research on his Academic.edu and ResearchGate pages.

Episode 10: C3 Frameworks for Social Studies with Kathy Swan

Dan and Michael interview Kathy Swan about the C3 Frameworks for Social Studies.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. The “motherload” of resources focused on Inquiry – C3teachers.org. Hopefully, this website will help you use the standards rather than having them simply be “an elf on the shelf.”
    1. This link brings you directly to the Inquiry Development Model – which should help teachers create inquiry units.
  2. National Council for the Social Studies. (2013). The college, career, and civic life (C3) framework for social studies state standards: Guidance for enhancing the rigor of K-12 civics, economics, geography, and history. Silver Spring, MD: National Council for the Social Studies. Available online http://www.socialstudies.org/c3

  3. I meant to bring up this book during the podcast as it deals with getting students to ask their own questions. I found that the C3 website also recommends it. So, you should read it! Rothstein, D., & Santana, L. (2011). Make just one change: Teach students to ask their own question Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.

Contact

Kathy Swan is a professor in the College of Education at University of Kentucky. You can contact Kathy and check out some of her work via her website.

Episode 9: Ethnic Studies with Christine Sleeter

In episode 9, Dan and Michael interview Christine Sleeter about Ethnic Studies.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Dr. Sleeter has written so many great articles – her Google Scholar page!
  2. Tintiangco-Cubales, A., Kohli, R., Sacramento, J., Henning, N., Agarwal-Rangnath, R., & Sleeter, C. (2015). Toward an ethnic studies pedagogy: Implications for K-12 schools from the research. The Urban Review, 47(1), 104-125.
  3. Sleeter, C. E. (2011). The Academic and Social Value of Ethnic Studies: A Research Review. National Education Association Research Department.
  4. Sleeter, C. (2015). White Bread: Weaving Cultural Past Into the Present. Sense. (Buy with free shipping!)

Contact

Christine Sleeter is Professor Emerita in the College of Professional Studies at California State University Monterey Bay. You can contact Christine on Twitter @CSleeter or via her website where you can continue to grow into a more critical educator through all her amazing resources. You can find her numerous publications on her site or her Google Scholar page.