Episode 122: Parkland Student Activism and Political Emotion with Kathleen Knight Abowitz & Dan Mamlok

In Episode 122, Dan and Michael offer condolences to the recent victims of mass shootings and talk with Kathleen Knight Abowitz and Dan Mamlok about their new article published in Theory & Research in Social Education, “The case of #NeverAgainMSD: When proceduralist civics becomes public work by way of political emotion.”

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Episode 122

Books, Articles and Other Amazing Resources

  1. Knight Abowitz, K., & Mamlok, D. (2019). The case of #NeverAgainMSD: When proceduralist civics becomes public work by way of political emotion. Theory & Research in Social Education, 47(2), 155-175.
  2. Please read, A Response to Mass Shootings from NCSS, which Kathleen Knight Abowitz, Dan Mamlok, and our own Dan Krutka helped write alongside the CUFA and NCSS boards.
  3. Check out our previous episode on Dewey!: Episode 70: John Dewey & Social Studies with Daniel Stuckart

Biographies

Kathleen Knight Abowitz is a professor of philosophy and social foundations of education in the Department of Educational Leadership in the College of Education, Health, and Society at Miami University of Ohio. Prior to coming to Miami, I helped create a service-learning program with students at the University of Mary Washington in Fredericksberg, Virginia (my home state!).  My research areas include democratic education, governance, and leadership issues in P-16 education. My work appears in leading peer-reviewed national and international journals such as Review of Educational Research, American Educational Research Journal, Teachers College Record, Journal of Teacher Education, Educational Policy, Phi Delta Kappan, and Educational Theory. You can download some of my published work here. I participate in public school activism, as a citizen of Ohio, through the Ohio Public School Advocacy Network.

Dan Mamlok is a Horizon Postdoctoral Fellow under the aegis of Concordia’s Early Childhood and Elementary Education program, the UNESCO Co-Chair in the Prevention of Radicalisation and Violent Extremism, and the federally funded SOMEONE Project. He holds a PhD in Educational Leadership, Culture, and Curriculum from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. His dissertation, Digital Technology and Education in the Age of Globalization, explored social and cultural aspects of integrating technology and education, and specifically dealt with questions regarding democracy, education, and citizenship. His research at Concordia University elaborates on some of the themes discussed in his dissertation, and specifically examines the influences of digitized play worlds on young children and the ways in which they forge their identity, with the aim of developing resilience against hate speech. Beyond his interests in educational technologies and sociocultural studies in education, his research interests include philosophy of education, democracy and education, and aesthetic education.

Episode 118: Elementary Social Studies Education Summit Review

In episode 118, Dan talks with planners and presenters at the first annual Elementary Social Studies Education Summit (ESSES) that took place in Wilmington, North Carolina on June 6th and 7th, 2019.

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Episode 118- Elementary Social Studies Education Summit

Books, Articles and Other Amazing Resources

  1. Check out the ESSES website for more on sessions, participants, and more: https://esses19.wordpress.com/
    1. Guests include (in order): the planners, Sohyun An, Sarah Shear, Noreen Naseem Rodriguez, Sara Demoiny, Rebecca Christ, Noreen Naseem Rodriguez (again!), Shanedra Nowell and Chris Fisher, Noreen and Sarah talking about the new journal, and finally Noreen’s keynote to finish!
    2. Here are the keynote and pre-summit speakers: https://esses19.wordpress.com/keynote-speakers/
    3. Here are resources from presenters at #ESSES19
  2. Here’s the website for the new journal introduced at the conference, The Critical Social Educator: https://www.iastatedigitalpress.com/tcse/
  3. Big thanks to the ESSES organizers: Lisa Brown Buchanan of University of North Carolina-Wilmington, Elizabeth Bellows of Appalachian State University, Elizabeth Saylor of the University of Georgia, Sarah B. Shear of the University of Washington Bothell, and Christina Tschida of East Carolina University! And here’s the 2018 book they edited: (Re)imagining elementary social studies: A controversial issues reader.
  4. Here’s a selection of previous elementary social studies episodes and episodes with ESSES participants:
    1. Episode 64: Elementary Social Studies with Anne-Lise Halvorsen
    2. Episode 76: Teaching Asian-American Histories with Noreen Naseem Rodriguez
    3. Episode 79: Black Critical Patriotism in Elementary Social Studies with Chris Busey & Irenea Walker
    4. Episode 84: Inquiry in Elementary Education with Emma Thacker, Erin Casey, Katie Knapp, & Carly Muetterties
    5. Episode 95: Affirming Indigenous Sovereignty with Sarah Shear, Leilani Sabzalian, & Lisa Brown Buchanan
    6. Episode 112: Welcoming Diverse Families in the Elementary Classroom with Selena Van Horn & Andrea Hawkman
    7. Episode 116: Indigenous Counterstories on an Elementary Field Trip with Harper Keenan
  5. While you can listen to former guest Dr. Noreen Naseem Rodriguez’s full keynote at the end of this episode, you can also listen and watch here:

Biography

The inaugural elementary social studies education summit, hosted by the University of North Carolina-Wilmington, will bring researchers and teacher educators together in two days of collaborative learning! Use the navigation links above to access information about the call for proposals, featured speakers, and more! You can follow them on Twitter at @esses2019.

Episode 111: Social Studies Simulations with Cory Wright-Maley

In this episode, Dan and Michael chat with Cory Wright-Maley of St. Mary’s University in Calgary, Canada about teaching simulations in the social studies.

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Episode 111- Social Studies Simulations

Books, Articles and Other Amazing Resources

  1. Check out Cory’s book featuring the work of the top scholars in studying simulations in the social studies: More like life itself: Simulations as powerful and purposeful social studies. The chapters include great examples of simulations in different areas of the social studies, conceptual and practical work around design and application of simulation, and examples of effective and ineffective practices with simulations.
  2. Cory’s work on specific simulations:
    1. Plague
    2. Deficit Crisis Monopoly
    3. OPEC
  3. Wright-Maley, C., Lee, J., & Friedman, A.M. (2018). Digital simulations, games, and other emerging technologies in historical learning. S. A. Metzger & L.M. Harris (Eds.). International Handbook of History Teaching and Learning. Wiley-Blackwell. This article provides a thorough review of the literature on how digital simulation and gaming are emerging as ways of approaching history education.
  4. Wright-Maley, C. (2015). What every social studies teacher should know about simulations. Canadian Social Studies, 48(1), 8-23. This article is a great primer for teachers thinking about simulations. It summarizes research and provides a good overview of the challenges and affordances of simulations in the social studies.
  5. Wright-Maley, C. (2015). On “stepping back and letting go”: The role of control in the success or failure of social studies simulations. Theory and Research in Social Education, 43(2), 206-243. This research paper discusses the role of teachers in mediating simulations, including how to manage them effectively. One of the key insights is how teacher control can improve or destroy a simulation.
  6. Wright-Maley, C. (2015). Beyond the “Babel problem”: Defining simulations for the social studies. Journal of Social Studies Research, 39(2), 63-77. This conceptual paper outlines what is and is not a simulation, and teases apart simulations from other related phenomenon (including a Venn diagram!)
  7. Wright-Maley, C. (2014). In defense of simulating complex and tragic historical episodes: A measured response to the outcry over a New England slavery simulation. Canadian Social Studies, 47(1), 18-25. This article tries to tease apart the challenges and affordances of teaching with simulations related to complex and tragic historical issues. Other authors provide excellent critiques of simulations of this kind. Cory suggests: Ingrid Drake’s note of caution on simulations of this kind, Monita K. Bell’s critical warning to steer clear, and Totten’s critique of Holocaust simulations
  8. For much more promising research and practice with simulations, see the great  work of Walter Parker & Jane Lo on government simulations, Simone Schweber’s study of a holocaust simulation, the GlobalEd simulations, and a number of sims by simulation training systems, who sell the StarPower simulation Dan discussed in this episode, Lorrei DiCamillo and Jill Gradwell’s work.
  9. For more information on simulations gone wrong, take a look here for the Third Wave simulation, here for the Stanford Prison Experiment, and the ever controversial Blue Eyes/Brown Eyes simulation here.

Biography

Cory Wright-Maley, Ph. D. is Associate Professor of Education at St. Mary’s University in Calgary, Canada, located in Treaty 7 Territory – the traditional land of the Blackfoot Confederacy, home to the Tsuu t’ina, and the Stoney Nakoda, as well as the Métis Nation, Region 3. He teaches social studies education and pedagogy. His research interests include simulations, democratic education, teacher education, and economic inequality. He is the co-editor of Teaching for Democracy in an Age of Economic Disparity (Routledge, 2017), and editor of More like Life Itself: Simulations as Powerful and Purposeful Social Studies (Information Age, 2019). He is also the co-recipient of a 2018 Alberta Education Grant for Innovation in Teacher Education directed at strengthening indigenous programming. You can learn more about him and his work at his university webpage and reach out to him on Twitter @Wright_Maley.

Episode 110: Connecting to Local Women’s History through Storytelling with Tina Ellsworth, Janelle Stigall, & Amy Walker

In this Women’s History Month episode, Dan and Michael chat with Tina Ellsworth, Janelle Stigall, and Amy Walker of Kansas about their new Social Studies and the Young Learner article, “Remembering the Ladies: Connect to Local Women’s History using Storytelling.”

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Episode 110- Connecting to Local Women’s History through Storytelling

Books, Articles and Other Amazing Resources

  1. Ellsworth, T. M., Stigall, J., & Walker, A. (2019). Remembering the Ladies: Connect to Local Women’s History using Storytelling. Social Studies and the Young Learner, 31(3), 14-18.
  2. For more on storytelling, see Judy Sima’s work and website: http://www.judysima.com/.

Biographies

Tina Ellsworth, Ph.D. is is the K-12 Social Studies Coordinator for Olathe Public Schools in Olathe, Kansas. You can tweet at her at @DrTinaEllsworth.

Janelle Stigall is a third grade Teacher at Madison Place Elementary in Olathe, Kansas. You can tweet at her at @JanelleStigall.

Amy Walker is a seventh grade Teacher at Summit Trail Middle School in Olathe, Kansas. You can tweet her at @MrsWalkerOPS.