Episode 78: Teaching for Gender Equity in Social Studies with Mardi Schmeichel

In episode 78, Dan and Michael chat with Mardi Schmeichel about gender equity in the social studies, including her 2015 article published Theory and Research in Social Education titled, “Skirting around critical feminist rationales for teaching women in social studies.”

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Mardi Schmeichel

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Episode 77: Approaches to Teaching Race in the Social Studies Classroom with Christopher C. Martell & Kaylene M. Stevens

In episode 77, Michael & Dan chat with Christopher C. Martell & Kaylene M. Stevens about their recently published Theory and Research in Social Education article “Equity- and Tolerance-Oriented Teachers: Approaches to Teaching Race in the Social Studies Classroom”. In their work, they share best practices of teachers and discuss the differences between the equity and tolerance approach to teaching race.

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Episode 75: Evil and Villainification in Social Studies with Cathryn van Kessel & Ryan Crowley

In episode 75, Michael & Dan chat with Cathryn van Kessel and Ryan M. Crowley about their recently published Theory and Research in Social Education article “Villainification and Evil in Social Studies Education. One of the big highlights is how to make ‘historical villains’ more three dimensional.

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Episode 74: Civic Online Reasoning with Sarah McGrew

In episode 74, Dan and Michael chat with Sarah McGrew of the Stanford History Education Group (SHEG about civic online reasoning, their new research published in TRSE, and how teachers can use the assessments.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. McGrew, S., Breakstone, J., Ortega, T., Smith, M. & Wineburg, S. (in press). Can students evaluate online sources?: Learning from assessments of civic online reasoning. Theory & Research in Social Education. Advance online publication. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00933104.2017.1416320
  2. Check out all the SHEG Civic Online Reasoning competencies and assessments: https://sheg.stanford.edu/civic-online-reasoning (requires login, but all materials are free!)
  3. “Why Students Can’t Google Their Way to the Truth: Fact-checkers and students approach websites differently” by Sam Wineburg and Sarah McGrew in EdWeek (11/01/16)
  4. The Challenge That’s Bigger Than Fake News: Civic Reasoning in a Social Media Environment” by Sarah McGrew, Teresa Ortega, Joel Breakstone, & Sam Wineburg in AFT.org
  5. Here’s an article that was written by a teacher collaborator: “Real Teaching in an Era of Fake News” by Will Colglazier in AFT.org.
  6. Wineburg, S. & McGrew, S. (2017, October 9). Lateral Reading: Reading Less and Learning More When Evaluating Digital Information. Stanford History Education Group Working Paper No. 2017-A1 (56 pages). 

     

Contact

Sarah McGrew co-directs SHEG’s Civic Online Reasoning project. She grew up in Michigan and earned a B.A. in Political Science and Education from Swarthmore College before completing the Stanford Teacher Education Program. After STEP, she taught world history in Washington, D.C., for five years. Sarah is now a doctoral student in the Stanford Graduate School of Education. She previously taught in STEP. In her free time, she enjoys swimming, baking, and exploring the West Coast.

Bio from https://sheg.stanford.edu/about/people

Episode 69: The Complexity of Citizenship for Black Women Social Studies Teachers with Amanda E. Vickery

In episode 69, Michael and Dan chat with Amanda E. Vickery to discuss her recent Theory & Research in Social Studies article “‘You excluded us for so long and now you want us to be patriotic?’: African American Women Teachers Navigating the Quandary of Citizenship.” Our conversation challenges the notion of what citizenship is and the many ways in which it can be taught. 

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Episode 63: Civics Simulations in the Classroom with Jane Lo

In episode 63, Michael & Dan discuss a project-based learning approach to government class – using simulations – with Jane Lo. Jane’s article “Adolescents Developing Civic Identities: Sociocultural Perspectives on Simulations and Role-Play in a Civic Classroom” was recently published by Theory & Research in Social Education.

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Episode 61: Civic Education and Bridging the Partisan Divide with Chris Clark

In Episode 61, Michael & Dan chat with Chris Clark about his recent Theory & Research in Social Studies article “Examining the Relationship Between Civic Education and Partisan Alignment in Young Voters.” Our conversation includes a discussion of building an open classroom environment AND how pizza should not be defined by tomato sauce.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Clark C. W. (2017).Examining the Relationship Between Civic Education and Partisan Alignment in Young Voters Theory & Research in Social Education, 45(2), 218 – 247.
  2. Clark C. W.  & Avery P.G. (2016) The Psychology of Controversial Issues’ Discussions: Challenges and Opportunities in a Polarized, Post-9/11 Society. In W. Journell’s, Reassessing the social studies curriculum: Promoting critical civic engagement in a politically polarized, post-9/11 world (pp. 109 – 119). Mitchellville, MD: Rowman & Littlefield
  3. Chris recently added an Adademia.edu profile! You can follow along his academic journey there!

Contact

Chris Clark recently graduated with a PhD in Curriculum & Instruction from the University of Minnesota. He will be starting a job teaching future social studies teachers at the University of Georgia in the Fall of 2017. Prior to academia, he taught high school social studies (US History, Current Events, Psychology, & Philosophy) for six years. His current research focus is on student political identity and how that influences learning and behavior in the classroom. You can reach him via email or on his brand new Twitter account!

Episode 60: Professional Development in the Age of Accountability with Kevin Meuwissen

In Episode 60, Michael & Dan chat with Kevin Meuwissen about his recent Theory & Research in Social Studies article “Happy Professional Development at an Unhappy Time”: Learning to Teach for Historical Thinking in a High-Pressure Accountability Context.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Meuwissen, K. W. (2017). “Happy Professional Development at an Unhappy Time”: Learning to Teach for Historical Thinking in a High-Pressure Accountability Context. Theory & Research in Social Education, 45(2), 248 – 285.
  2. Meuwissen, K. W. (2013). Readin’, Writin’, Ready for Testin’? Adaptive Assessment in Elective and Standardized-Tested Social Studies Course Contexts. Theory & Research in Social Education, 41(3), 285 – 315.
  3. Meuwissen, K. W. (2013). Teachers are Political Actors. What Does This Mean for Teacher Education? [Blog Post].  Retrieved from Warner Perspectives 
  4. You can find his articles for the Huffington Post by clicking here!

Contact

Kevin Meuwissen is a professor of Teaching & Curriculum at the Warner School at the University of Rochester where he directs the social studies teacher preparation program. His teaching and research focus on helping secondary social studies teachers develop a deliberative stance toward curriculum, instruction, and the political institution of schooling as they interact with diverse influences on their pedagogical decisions. In addition to being an expert in his field, he is a dapper dresser. You can email him at kmeuwissen@warner.rochester.edu. Check out his university webpage for more!

Episode 59: Heritage Narratives with Sara Levy

sara-levy

In episode 59, Dan and Michael talk with Sara Levy about teaching heritage narratives.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Levy, S. A. (2017). How Students Navigate the Construction of Heritage Narratives. Theory & Research in Social Education, 45(2), 157-188.
  2. Levy, S. A. (2014). Heritage, history, and identity. Teachers College Record, 116(6), 1-17.
  3. And here’s a video of Dr. Levy talking about her article inTeachers College Record:

https://vialogues.com/videos/embedded/21195

Contact

Sara A. Levy, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Education at Wells College in Aurora, New York. Her research focuses on teaching and learning in public school history classrooms around global historical events with which students have heritage connections. You can tweet her @ProfSlevy or e-mail her at slevy@wells.edu.