Episode 73: A Social Studies Review of 2017 with Nate Bowling & Wayne Journell

In episode 73, Dan and Michael chat with 2016 Washington Teacher of the Year Nate Bowling and TRSE editor Wayne Journell .

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Listen to previous episodes with Nate and Wayne:
    1. Episode 52: Social Studies Research with Wayne Journell
    2. Episode 32: A Reflection on the 2016 Presidential Election with Nate Bowling & Chris Hitchcock
    3. Episode 26: School Equity & Resources with Nate Bowling
    4. Episode 8: Teacher Political Disclosure with Wayne Journell
  2. You can find more about Nate’s work on his site at http://www.natebowling.com/; And you can listen to Nate’s podcast, Nerd Farmer access Nate’s Nerd Farmer podcast on his website (http://www.natebowling.com/podcast/) and other podcast providers.
  3. You can find Wayne Journell’s books on Amazon (author page), including his newest one, Teaching Politics in Secondary Education: Engaging With Contentious Issues and also Teaching Social Studies in an Era of Divisiveness: The Challenges of Discussing Social Issues in a Non-Partisan Way. Buy them, read them, and be a better social studies educator!

Contact

Nate Bowling currently teaches AP Government and Human Geography at Lincoln High in the Tacoma School District in Washington state. You can contact him on Twitter at @Nate_Bowling.

Wayne Journell is an education professor at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. You can contact Wayne on Twitter @UNCGSocStudies or check out his website where you are steps away to reading more of his work.

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Episode 72: Compelling Questions with Rebecca Mueller

In episode 72, Dan and Michael ask lots of compelling questions to Rebecca Mueller about her work on using compelling questions in the classroom.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Mueller, R. G. W. (2017). Calibrating your “compelling compass”: Teacher-constructed prompts to assist question development. Social Education, 81(6), 343-345.
  2. Mueller, R. G. W. (in press). Examining teachers’ development and implementation of compelling questions. Social Studies Research and Practice, 13(1).

  3. Mueller, R. G. W. (2017). From potential to practice: Compelling questions as an impetus for curricular and instructional change. Journal of Social Studies Research. doi:10.1016/j.jssr.2017.08.003i

  4. Mueller, R. G. W. (2016). Making them fit: Examining teacher support for student questioning. Social Studies Research and Practice, 11(1), 40-55.

  5. And don’t forget to check out the C3 Teachers site and Episode 10: C3 Frameworks for Social Studies with Kathy Swan!

Contact

Rebecca Mueller is Assistant Professor of Social Studies Education at University of South Carolina Upstate. Her research focuses on social studies teachers’ use of inquiry and questioning. You can contact her at rmuelle2@uscupstate.edu or @rgw_mueller on Twitter, which might encourage her to actually use her Twitter account.

Episode 69: The Complexity of Citizenship for Black Women Social Studies Teachers with Amanda E. Vickery

In episode 69, Michael and Dan chat with Amanda E. Vickery to discuss her recent Theory & Research in Social Studies article “‘You excluded us for so long and now you want us to be patriotic?’: African American Women Teachers Navigating the Quandary of Citizenship.” Our conversation challenges the notion of what citizenship is and the many ways in which it can be taught. 

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources Continue reading

Episode 67: American Indians in Children’s Literature with Debbie Reese

In episode 67, Dan and Michael talk with Debbie Reese, a tribally enrolled Nambe Owingeh member, an educator and activist, and the founder of the popular American Indians in Children’s Literature (AICL) website and blog.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Check out Dr. Reese’s website for a wealth of resources including her vast resources on Indigenous children’s literature: https://americanindiansinchildrensliterature.blogspot.com/
  2. Learn more about the children who died at Carlisle Indian School, Army begins unearthing remains of children who died at Carlisle Indian school (2017, August 8).
  3. Some books Debbie recommended in the episode (in general order of grade level from younger to older):
    1. Jingle Dancer by Cynthia Leitich Smith
    2. Indian Shoes by Cynthia Leitich Smith
    3. In the Footsteps of Crazy Horse by Joseph Marshall III
    4. If I Ever Get Out of Here by Eric Gansworth
  4. Source for learning more about Indigenous books, peoples, cultures, & sovereignty:
    1. A Broken Flute: The Native Experience in Books for Children by Doris Seale & Beverly Slapin (editors)
    2. Lessons From Turtle Island: Native Curriculum in Early Childhood Classrooms by Guy W. Jones & Sally Moomaw, Ed.D.
    3. Page of resources that includes encyclopedias:
    4. Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
    5. Interview of Debbie with the English Journal (check it out English teachers!): http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/Journals/EJ/1061_sep2016/EJ1061WeAre.pdf
    6. A great article by Dr. Reese, “Indigenizing Children’s Literature
  5. Work Dr. Reese did last year for the First Nations Development Institute:
  6. Debbie’s blog posts:
    1. ” Are we people of color?
    2. Top Board Books for the Youngest Readers

Contact

Debbie Reese is tribally enrolled at Nambe Owingeh, a federally recognized tribe. She taught elementary school in Albuquerque, Riverside Indian School in Anadarko, Oklahoma, and returned home to Santa Fe Indian School in Santa Fe and Pojoaque Elementary School in Pojoaque, New Mexico. She completed her doctorate at the University of Illinois where she helped establish the Native American House, launched an American Indian Studies program, and helped push the university to discontinue  mascot was discontinue their stereotypical Indian mascot. She launched the American Indians in Children’s Literature (AICL) website and blog in May of 2006. She can be found on Twitter @debreese.

Episode 66: Teaching Geography with Chris Heffernan

In episode 66, Dan and Michael talk with middle school world geography teacher and #WorldGeoChat moderator Chris Heffernan about teaching geography.

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ChrisHeffernan

Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Check out the #WorldGeoChat moderated chats on Twitter on Tuesday nights at 9pm EST/8pm CST or join the conversation 24/7 using the hashtag
  2. You can find the #WorldGeoChat blog at WorldGeoChat.wordpress.com
  3. “The Power of a PLN” from the #WorldGeoChat squad  for National Geographic: https://blog.education.nationalgeographic.com/2017/08/24/the-power-of-a-pln/
  4. Chris has written a number of helpful blog posts, including:
    1. Stop making students memorize maps!
    2. 3 ways to add geography to your classroom
    3. You don’t need to teach geography to be a global educator
    4. 3 things we could do tomorrow to make Americans geoliterate
    5. Why geography matters now more than ever
    6. Geography to save the world
  5. Check out the National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE) and their conference at ncge.org
  6. Check out Google Earth; Google My Maps; Google Expeditions
  7. Blog posts from #WorldGeoChat moderator Pete Spiegal on Google Maps:
    1. New Google Earth basics
    2. New Online Google Earth tutorial: Part II
    3. New Online Google Earth Tutorial: Part III
  8. Planet Money T-Shirt Project NPR story, series, videos (intro, part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4, part 5, all) and Lesson Plan
  9. 99% Invisible podcast episode on shipping containers: http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/reefer-madness/
  10. Chris has his students plot out 10 countries and physical features in a region on satellite view to understand and do a See-Think-Wonder: What do you see? What do think about what you see? What do you wonder about what you see?
  11. Check out the UN Sustainable Development Goals: GlobalGoals.org

Contact

Chris Heffernan teaches 7th-grade world geography at Jefferson Junior High School in Naperville, Illinois, and is starting his seventeenth year there. He loves maps, but hates when students are forced to memorize them. Chris has focused his course on having students appreciate the different ways that people around the world are influenced by physical systems. He is passionate about water issues and strives to have his students take action to solve problems ranging from issues at school to the global water crisis. He can be found on Twitter @cheffernan75 and through the #worldgeochat blog (worldgeochat.wordpress.com).

Episode 65: Building a Flipped Community with Andrew Swan

In episode 65,  Michael & Dan chat with middle school teacher Andrew Swan about his efforts in building an online flipped community on Twitter and the use of blogging!

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Check out Andrew’s blog – Flipping Awesome Teaching!
    1. Andrew’s post Introducing #FlipBlogs
  2. #FlipBlogs on Twitter
    1. Archive for a #FlipBlog live chat
  3. Check out our episode on Episode 49: Flipped Classrooms with Elizabeth Miller.
  4. Here are some of the resources that he mentioned:
    1. Flipped Learning Network – Flipped Learning Network is the “best one-stop shopping site for all things flipping”
      1. Check out his author page there!
      2. Flipped Learning Slack page – requires an account. Chat’s are every other week
      3. Flipped Learning definition per Flipped Learning Network
  5. Some blogs about Flipped Classroom
    1. Jon Bergmann’s Flipped Learning Global Initiative. Jon is ‘one of the main pioneers and popularizers of FL. In some countries, 10%+ of teachers are already following this practice, and a few schools are 100% flipped.’
    2. Matthew T. Moore’s Points of Interest for a Flipped Educator (math teacher)
    3. Chrystal Kirch’s Flipping with Kirch (math teacher)

Contact

Andrew Swan has taught middle school for the past 17 years! He earned a B.A. in History at Yale University and received a Master’s degree in teaching from Simmons College. During his teaching career, he has taught 6th, 7th, and 8th grade English, ancient history, and geography in Maine and Massachusetts. Reach him on twitter – @Flipping_A_Tchr or through his blog! Don’t stop looking for him, Swan.

Episode 64: Elementary Social Studies with Anne-Lise Halvorsen

In episode 64, Dan and Michael chat about elementary social studies with Michigan State professor Anne-Lise Halvorsen.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. You can find more info about Anne-Lise’s work on her website at annelise.wiki.educ.msu.edu/home.

History of Elementary Social Studies

  1. Halvorsen, A. (2013).  A history of elementary social studies: Romance and reality. New York: Peter Lang. https://www.peterlang.com/view/product/28177
  2. Halvorsen, A. (May-June, 2009). Back to the future: The expanding communities curriculum in geography education. The Social Studies, 100, 115-120. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3200/TSSS.100.3.115-120?journalCode=vtss20

Project-based Learning

  1. Halvorsen, A., Duke, N. K., Brugar, K. A., Block, M. K., Strachan, S. L., Berka, M. B., & Brown, J. M. (2012). Narrowing the achievement gap in second-grade socialstudies and content area literacy: The promise of a project-based approach. Theory and Research in Social Education, 40, 198-229. http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/91282680/narrowing-achievement-gap-second-grade-social-studies-content-area-literacy-promise-project-based-approach
  2. Duke, N. K., Halvorsen, A., & Strachan, S.L. (2016). Project-based learning not just for STEM anymore. Phi Delta Kappan98(1), 14-19.  http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0031721716666047
  3. Duke, N.K., & Halvorsen, A. (2017, June 20). New study shows the impact of PBL on student achievement [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.edutopia.org/article/new-study-shows-impact-pbl-student-achievement-nell-duke-anne-lise-halvorsen 
  4. Halvorsen, A., & Duke, N.K. (2017, June 20). Projects that have been put to the test [Web log post]. https://www.edutopia.org/article/projects-have-been-put-test-anne-lise-halvorsen-nell-duke

Adolescents’ Use of Evidence

  1. Crocco, M., Halvorsen, A., Jacobsen, R., & Segall, A. (2017). Teaching with evidence. Phi Delta Kappan 98(7), 67-71. https://www.pdkmembers.org/members_online/publications/archive/pdf/PDK_98_7/67pdk_98_7.pdf

Contact

Anne-Lise Halvorsen is an associate professor of teacher education, specializing in social studies education, at Michigan State University. Halvorsen’s work focuses on elementary social studies education, the history of education, the integration of social studies and literacy, teacher preparation in the social studies, and students’ historical thinking. She is author of A History of Elementary Social Studies: Romance and Reality (Peter Lang, 2013), and co-author, with Jere Brophy and Janet Alleman, of the third edition of the social studies methods textbook, Powerful Social Studies for Elementary Students (Cengage, 2012). She is a former kindergarten teacher and former curriculum writer for the state of Michigan. You can find more on her website and e-mail her atannelise@msu.edu.