Episode 19: Panel Discussion on the First Five Days of School

In episode 19, Michael and Dan talk with a panel of K – 12 educators about the importance of the first five days of school.
The panel includes:

  • Author and educator Quinn Rollins
  • 7th grade science teacher Laura Vago
  • 7th grade English teacher Jennifer Maio
  • 2nd grade teacher Jessica Rosenthal

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. The Massachusetts Teachers Association’s New Member Committee has a blog for teachers in their first five year of education. Check it out!
  2. Vago, Laura, “Don’t smile before Christmas: Is it true?” Web blog post. The First 900 Days: MTA New Member Committee. 24 Oct. 2014. 
  3. Milton, Michael K. “Teaching Historical Interpretation: Interpreting Student Life Events.” Web blog post. Michael K. Milton’s Musings on History and Education (mostly). 30 June 2014.
  4. Wong, Harry K, and Rosemary T. Wong. The First Days of School: How to Be an Effective Teacher. , 1998. Print.
    1. Dan made a reference to this early on in the podcast. But he thinks there should be many books on the topic.
  5. Quinn Rollins was featured in a standalone Visions of Education! Episode 6: Superheroes in the Classroom. Listen to it!

Contact

Jennifer Maio, a seventh grade English teacher, can be reached on Twitter – @JMaio88

Quinn Rollins, author of Play Like a Pirate: Engage Students with Toys, Games, and Comics, can be reached on Twitter – @JediKermit

Jessica Rosenthal, a second grade teacher, can be reached on Twitter – @JessMorningstar

Laura Vago, a seventh grade science teacher, can be reached on Twitter – @LRVago

 

Episode 18: Note-taking Strategies for Students with Learning Disabilities with Joseph Boyle

In episode 18, Michael and Dan talk with Joseph Boyle about note-taking strategies for students with learning disabilities.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Here is a link to everything that Joseph Boyle has written!  
  2. Here is the link to Dr. Boyle’s very helpful strategic note-taking website! Peruse to learn more about the strategy, research information about it, and teacher resources!
  3. Two articles that Joe recommends for teachers wanting to know more.
    1. Boyle, J. R., Forchelli, G. A., & Cariss, K. (2015) Note-taking interventions to assist students with disabilities in content area classes.  Preventing School Failure: Alternative Education for Children and Youth, 59:3, 186-195, DOI: 10.1080/1045988X.2014.903463
    2. Boyle, J.R. (2012).  Note-taking and students with learning disabilities: Challenges and solutions.  Learning Disabilities Research and Practice, 27(2), 90-101.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-5826.2012.00354.x.
      1. Note: This article was the one Michael read prior to meeting Dr. Boyle.

Contact

Joseph R. Boyle is an associate professor of special education in the College of Education at Temple University in Philadelphia. To contact him (or learn more about him), check out this link.

Episode 17: Teacher PLNs with Torrey Trust, Jeff Carpenter, & Dan Krutka

In episode 17, Michael talks with Torrey Trust, Jeff Carpenter, and Dan Krutka about teacher Professional Learning Networks (PLNs).

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Most importantly, here’s Torrey’s blog post, How Surfing Prepared Me for Graduate School. Look for Okie Dan Krutka’s upcoming post about how the wave pool at Big Splash prepared him for teaching.
  2. You can find the research study that is the focus of our discussion:
    Trust, T., Krutka, D. G., & Carpenter, J. P. (2016). “Together we are better”: Professional learning networks for whole teachers. Computers & Education, 102(1), 15-34. (Open access until August 29th, 2016!)
  3. The 3-part framework we discuss is currently part of an article titled, “Enriching Professional Learning Networks: A Framework for Identification, Reflection, and Intention.” The framework encourages educators to consider to what degree the people, spaces, and tools (e.g., resources, skills, ideas, teaching strategies) benefit them and their students. This manuscript is currently under review, but we will share it once we are able to.
  4. You can find Torrey’s research on PLNs on her ResearchGate profile.
  5. You can find Jeff’s research on on his ResearchGate profile.
  6. You can find Dan’s research on his page at ResearchGate (requires log-in), Academia.edu, or Google Scholar.
  7. Some of the platforms and events you can use to grow your PLN include:
    1. Twitter (Jeff and Dan’s research) and Twitter chats (primer)
    2. Voxer
    3. Google+ Communities
    4. Edmodo Subject Communities
    5. Pinterest
    6. Edcamp unconferences (see Jeff’s ResearchGate profile for edcamp research)
    7. And more!
  8. We will continually add links to our research and much more at ProfessionalLearningNetworks.com.

Contact

Torrey Trust is an assistant professor of learning technology in the teacher education and curriculum studies department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Be a part of Torrey’s PLN by tweeting her @torreytrust.

Jeff Carpenter is an associate professor of education and the director of teaching fellows program Elon University. You can be a learn more about his teaching fellow program by visiting elon.edu/teachingfellows. You can tweet at him @doccarpenter.

Dan Krutka is on, like, every episode. You know where to find him.😉

Episode 16: Mentoring for retention with Destiny Warrior

In episode 16, Dan and Michael talk with Destiny Warrior about mentoring for retention in schools.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Richard Ingersoll has done a lot of research on teacher retention, including the following articles: Ingersoll, R. M., & Smith, T. M. (2003). The wrong solution to the teacher shortage. Educational leadership, 60(8), 30-33; Also, here is a 2014 article Destiny recommends from Dian Schaffhauser “The Problem Isn’t Teacher Recruiting; It’s Retention.”
  2. If you’d like to watch some teacher movies, we mentioned Dead Poet’s Society (inspiring, but Mr. Keating doesn’t do much actual teaching), Dangerous Minds (classroom management = black jacket and karate!), and Chalk (two thumbs up from Michael!)
  3. Destiny recommended this interview with Coach K, basketball coach at Duke University, by Richard Hackman when considering how to connect with your star teachers: Sitkin, S. B., & Hackman, J. R. (2011). Developing team leadership: An interview with coach Mike Krzyzewski. Academy of Management Learning & Education, 10(3), 494-501.

Contact

Destiny Warrior is a classroom teacher in Mid-Del schools and an adjunct instructor at the University of Oklahoma. She can be contacted via email  – dwarrior@mid-del.net – or you can tweet her @destinylwarrior.

Episode 15: Indigenous (Mis)Representations in U.S. History with Sarah Shear

In episode 15, Michael and Dan talk with Sarah Shear about Indigenous (Mis)Representations in U.S. History.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Here is a link to everything that Sarah Shear has written!  
  2. Zinn, H. (1980) A People’s History of America. New York: HarperCollins Publishers.
  3. Loewen, J. W. (1995). Lies my teacher told me: Everything your American history textbook got wrong. New York: New Press.
  4. Shear, S.B., Knowles, R.T., Soden, G., & Castro, A.J. (2015). Manifesting destiny: Re/presentations of Indigenous people in K-12 U.S. history curriculum. Theory & Research in Social Education, 43(1), 68-101.
  5. The quote Michael cited was “The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.”It was written by British novelist L.P. Hartley and opens his 1953 novel The Go-Between. There is also a movie.
  6. Dunbar-OrtizR., Gilio-Whitaker, D. (Upcoming). “All the Real Indians Died Off”: And 20 other myths about Native Americans. Boston, MA: Beacon Press.
  7. Dunbar-OrtizR. (2015). An indigenous people’s history to the United States: ReVisioning American history. Boston, MA: Beacon Press.
  8. The National Museum of the American Indian – Sarah mentioned this as a great resource with curricular materials
  9. Stanford History Education Group (SHEG). Battle of Little Bighorn lesson.
  10. Visions of Education Episode 10: C3 Frameworks with Kathy Swan

Contact

Sarah Shear is Assistant Professor of Social Studies Education at Penn State Altoona (which is fun to say…Altoona!). She can be contacted via email  – sbs5180@psu.edu – or you can follow (and chat with) on twitter – @SbShear!

Episode 14: Equity Literacy with Paul Gorski

In episode 14, Michael and Dan discuss Equity Literacy with Paul Gorski.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Gorski, P. (2008). The myth of the Culture of Poverty. Educational Leadership, 65(7),  32-36.
  2. Visions of Education Episode 11: Rethinking Black History with LaGarrett King
  3. Edchange.org (the organization Paul founded)
    1. A direct link to most of Paul’s publications

Contact

Paul C. Gorski is Associate Professor of Integrative Studies in New Century College at George Mason University. He founded the organization edchange.org and you can contact him on Twitter – @pgorski.

Episode 13: Creating Authentic Media with hosts Dan and Michael

In this extended conversation, Michael and Dan discuss creating authentic media for both educators and students. This episode is our longest, but it is chock full of ideas. Check out the resources below!

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Quick definition: Authentic media – media (we’ll be discussing digital) that is shared with a larger audience.
  2. Visions of Education Episode 11: Rethinking Black History with LaGarrett King
  3. ReadWriteThink’s The Nuts and Bolts of Podcasts (not discussed during the episode, but could be helpful).
  4. The StoryCorps app available on Google Play and iTunes.
  5. Podcasting Resources
    1. Voxer – a way connect asynchronously via text and voice
    2. Skype – we use to chat with our guests
    3. ECamm – we use this to record Skype
    4. Audacity – we use this to edit our discussions
    5. SoundCloud – we upload our podcast to this which the is then picked up by iTunes, Stitcher, and a few other places.
  6. Here are a few of the images that we discussed in this podcast

  7. Historical Digitally Altered Image Project. A blog post by Michael K. Milton
  8. Editing Digital Image Resources
    1. Photoshop
    2. Pixelmator
    3. Explain Everything
  9. A High School Teacher’s Experience with Keeping Pace During Snow Days. A blog post that Michael wrote about creating screencasts (with some resources and explanation).
  10. Video Creation Resources
    1. Screencast-o-matic
    2. Snagit
    3. MindOverMedia: Analyzing Contemporary Propaganda (www.mindovermedia.tv)
    4. Visions of Education Episode 7: Propaganda with Renee Hobbs
    5. “5 Educational Philosophies” by Prof. Krutka’s class: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3H0DbcDbIbs]
  11. Social Media Resources
    1. TodaysMeet
    2. The Enlightenment Meets Social Media. A blog post by Michael about his use of social media to teach about the Enlightenment.
    3. Rheingold, H. (2010). Attention, and Other 21st-Century Social Media LiteraciesEducause Review45(5), 14-24.
    4. Visions of Education Episode 4: Inside/Outside Sharing with Wes Fryer
    5. The (Industrial) Revolution Will be Twitterized. A blog post by Michael about using Twitter to look at the spreading of the Industrial Revolution.
    6. Dan’s social media lesson for his classes
    7. Krutka, D. G. (in press). Remixing current events: Navigating the transmedia terrain with young learners. Social Studies and the Young Learner.
  12. Websites/Blogs
    1. MichaelKMilton.com
    2. DanKrutka.wordpress.com
    3. Dan’s Educational Foundations class website
  13. Videoconferencing
    1. While #MysterySkype can take many forms, here’s a blog post about one way to do it.
    2. Krutka, D. G. & Carano, K. T. (2016). “As long as I see you on Facebook I know you are safe”: Social media experiences as humanizing pedagogy. In A. R. Crowe & A. Cuenca (Eds.), Rethinking social studies teacher education in the twenty-first century (pp. 207-222). Switzerland: Springer International.

Contact

Michael K. Milton and Dan Krutka are the hosts of this podcast! Our information can be found in the about section. Contact them at @VisionsOfEd or individually at @42ThinkDeep (Michael) and @DanKrutka (Dan).

 

Episode 12: Using Films Effectively with Jeremy Stoddard

In episode 12, Michael and Dan interview Jeremy Stoddard about effectively using film in the classroom (and talk about Godzilla).

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. You can find a list of Jeremy’s pubs HERE and his open access publications HERE.
  2. This article provides a fantastic and brief introduction to teaching effectively with film: Stoddard, J. (2014). Teaching thoughtfully with and about film. Social Education, 78(5), 220-224.
  3. Jeremy references this study: Marcus, A. S., & Stoddard, J. D. (2007). Tinsel town as teacher: Hollywood film in the high school classroom. The History Teacher, 40(3), 303-330.
  4. A great book on using film: Marcus, A., Metzger, S., Paxton, R., and Stoddard, J. (2010). Teaching history with film: Strategies for secondary social studies. New York: Routledge.
  5. Jeremy’s newest book should be out next year!: Stoddard, J., Marcus, A., and Hicks, D. (Eds.) (forthcoming, 2017). Teaching Difficult History through Film. New York: Routledge.
  6. Hobbs, R. (2006). Non‐optimal Uses of Video in the ClassroomLearning, Media and Technology31(1), 35-50.

Contact

Jeremy Stoddard is an Associate Professor of Education and Associated faculty in the  film and media studies program at the College of William & Mary. You can follow Jeremy on Twitter @Jeremy_Stoddard, find more of his research on his ResearchGate or his sites listed above, and learn more about his work on his William & Mary site.

Episode 11: Rethinking Black History with LaGarrett King

In episode 11, Dan and Michael interview LaGarrett King about Rethinking Black History.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. There are a number of books on the Tulsa Race Riots and Dan recommends the following: Hirsch, J. S. (2003). Riot and remembrance: The Tulsa race war and its legacy. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.
  2. King, L. J., & Womac, P. (2014). A Bundle of silences: Examining the racial representation of Black founding fathers of the United States through Glenn Beck’s founders’ Fridays. Theory & Research in Social Education, 42(1), 35-64.
  3. For more on Carter G. Woodson, see LaGarrett’s article: King, L. J., Crowley, R. M., & Brown, A. L. (2010). The forgotten legacy of Carter G. Woodson: Contributions to multicultural social studies and African American history. The Social Studies, 101(5), 211-215.
  4. bell hooks talks about her experiences as a student in segregated and integrated schools in the “Introduction” of her book, Teaching to transgress: Education as the practice of freedom.
  5. Dan recommends “The Problem We All Live With” podcast episode from This American Life to consider contemporary issues of segregation and integration.
  6. Michael recommends this lesson for teaching about women’s roles in the Civil Rights movement from The Choices Program lesson, “Freedom Now: The Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi.”

Contact

LaGarrett King is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Learning, Teaching, & Curriculum at the University of Missouri – Columbia. You can follow LaGarrett on Twitter @DrLaGarrettKing and find more of his research on his Academic.edu and ResearchGate pages.

Episode 10: C3 Frameworks for Social Studies with Kathy Swan

Dan and Michael interview Kathy Swan about the C3 Frameworks for Social Studies.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. The “motherload” of resources focused on Inquiry – C3teachers.org. Hopefully, this website will help you use the standards rather than having them simply be “an elf on the shelf.”
    1. This link brings you directly to the Inquiry Development Model – which should help teachers create inquiry units.
  2. National Council for the Social Studies. (2013). The college, career, and civic life (C3) framework for social studies state standards: Guidance for enhancing the rigor of K-12 civics, economics, geography, and history. Silver Spring, MD: National Council for the Social Studies. Available online http://www.socialstudies.org/c3

  3. I meant to bring up this book during the podcast as it deals with getting students to ask their own questions. I found that the C3 website also recommends it. So, you should read it! Rothstein, D., & Santana, L. (2011). Make just one change: Teach students to ask their own question Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.

Contact

Kathy Swan is a professor in the College of Education at University of Kentucky. You can contact Kathy and check out some of her work via her website.