Episode 126: Lessons, Metaphors, & Planning with the UCLA History-Geography Project

Episode 126: Lessons, Metaphors, & Planning with the UCLA History-Geography Project

In Episode 126, Dan and Michael have a wide ranging chat about lessons, metaphors, and planning with Daniel Diaz, Amparo Chavez-Gonzalez, Miguel Covarrubias, and Chris Lewis of the UCLA History-Geography Project.

Subscribe on iTunes Subscribe to Stitcher

 

Episode 126

Books, Articles and Other Amazing Resources

  1. Check out the UCLA History-Geography Project: https://centerx.gseis.ucla.edu/history-geography/
  2. The UCLA History-Geography Project “Canvas” planning document: https://www.icloud.com/iclouddrive/0_3Vd7fNqv4fkAchCWXXFLlcw#HGP_Canvas  and worked example of the Canvas: https://www.icloud.com/iclouddrive/05E6ZM-QLRBBYEb3xSmvYvuHg#HGP_Canvas_Recon_Example
  3. The UCLA HGP’s “Lesson Planning Process”: https://www.icloud.com/iclouddrive/0MewWEfUDuu-VMt9VO4_C2inQ#HGP_Lesson_Process. We’re working on our version of the C3 protocol to include pieces important to us such as culturally responsive instruction.

Biographies

Meet the the UCLA History-Geography Project team: https://centerx.gseis.ucla.edu/history-geography/people/

Daniel Diaz is the Director of the UCLA History-Geography Project and has been with the project for the last 5 years. Prior to this, Daniel taught high school World, US, and AP US History at Roosevelt High School in Boyle Heights and at El Rancho High School in Pico Rivera. Daniel earned his Ed.D in Educational Psychology from USC in 2013. His research focused on learning outcomes for at-risk youth such as homeless and foster students. He ran a non-profit called “Project Deviate” that supported foster youth in Pico Rivera. His work at the UCLA History-Geography Project involves supporting history teachers in urban communities. You can follow the project on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook @uclahgp. You can also visit the UCLA History-Geography Project for lessons, resources, and professional development opportunities.

Amparo Chavez-Gonzalez is a Coach and Lead Facilitator for the UCLA History-Geography Project which she joined in 2004. Amparo has been working in urban schools in New York City and Los Angeles as a History and English teacher in elementary, middle, and high schools since 1990. Early on in her career she joined Central Park East Secondary (CPESS), founded by Deborah Meier and Ted Brown. CPESS was founded with the notion that all students deserve a high quality, project-based, and individualized education.  So Amparo began her journey to curriculum writing, researching primary sources, creating simulations, and emphasizing reading and writing, in her history courses. For a short while Amparo left the classroom to support community organizations supporting teens to enter college but returned to curriculum writing when she joined StreetLaw.  She has her undergraduate degree from Princeton and her MA in the Teaching of Reading and Writing from Columbia, Teacher’s College.  Amparo loves looking at literacy and culturally relevant sources to engage students and get them ready to go to and graduate from high school. Email: amps729@g.ucla.edu

Miguel Covarrubias is a teacher at Cortines High School (VAPA) in Downtown Los Angeles. He has his Bachelor’s degree in History from the University of California, Riverside and his Master’s in Education from the University of California, Los Angeles. He has developed curriculum for LAUSD, the ACLU and the UCLA History-Geography Project. He was the recipient of the United Way Inspirational Teacher Award in 2014. His teaching is rooted in both culturally responsive teaching practices and social cultural theory. He believes teaching history should be a vehicle for creating positive change in communities and should give a voice to marginalized communities whose stories and contributions have long been left out of mainstream history instruction.

Chris Lewis is a Teacher on Special Assignment supporting English Learners and is currently teaching ELD 2.  He has taught Social Science and English, primarily AP United States History and AVID, for the last fifteen years at Mountain View High School in El Monte, CA.  Chris earned his Ph.D. in Education from Chapman University (Orange, CA) in 2015 and his dissertation, “The Spaces Between Dystopia and Utopia: Student Perspectives on Identity, Schooling, and Resistance,” explores the ways youth analyze dystopian fiction and its impact on their identity formation and civic engagement.  His research interests include student voice, young adult dystopian literature, civic engagement, and LGBTQ histories. Follow him on Twitter @chrislewis_10 and read about his work at www.ateachersponderings.com.

Episode 124: Elementary Citizenship From A Century Ago with Carolyn Weber & Sarah Montgomery

In Episode 124, Dan and Michael talk with Drs. Carolyn Weber and Sarah Montgomery about their new article published in Theory & Research in Social Education, “The emergence of elementary citizenship education: Insights from Iowa’s rural schools, 1910–1935.” It is kind of like that West Wing episode where everyone is talking about that book about what life was like 100 years ago – except set in rural schools in Iowa.

Subscribe on iTunes Subscribe to Stitcher

Episode 124- Elementary Citizenship From A Century Ago.png

Books, Articles and Other Amazing Resources Continue reading

Episode 123: Contained Risk-Taking When Teaching Controversial Issues with Judy Pace

In Episode 123, Dan and Michael talk with Dr. Judy Pace about her new article published in Theory & Research in Social Education, “Contained risk-taking: Preparing preservice teachers to teach controversial issues in three countries.”

Subscribe on iTunes Subscribe to Stitcher

Episode 123- Contained risk-taking When Teaching Controversial Issues

Books, Articles and Other Amazing Resources

  1. Pace, J. L. (2019). Contained risk-taking: Preparing preservice teachers to teach controversial issues in three countries. Theory & Research in Social Education, 47(2), 228-260.
  2. Pace, J. L. (2017/18). Preparing teachers in a divided society: Lessons from Northern Ireland. Phi Delta Kappan, 99(4), 26-32.
  3. Buy her book!: Pace, J. L. (2015). The charged classroom: Predicaments and possibilities for democratic teaching. Routledge.
  4. There are various examples of educators and scholars using the Structured Academic Controversy (SAC) model and here is one: Nathan, E., & Lee, C. K. E. (2004). Using structured academic controversies in the social studies classroom. Teaching and Learning, 25(2), 171-188.

Biography

Dr. Judith L. Pace is an education professor who uses case studies, inquiry projects, and film to challenge students to explore multiple perspectives on issues of educational justice. She does qualitative research on classroom teaching and its sociocultural and political dynamics. Her current project examines how teacher educators prepare preservice teachers for teaching controversial issues in divided societies and politically turbulent times. Recent articles include “Contained risk-taking: preparing preservice teachers to teach controversial issues in three countries” and “Preparing teachers in a divided society: Lessons from Northern Ireland.” Her forthcoming book is titled Hard Questions: Learning to Teach Controversial Issues. Professor Pace earned her doctorate of education from Harvard University where she worked on school reform efforts at Project Zero. See full biography at the University of San Francisco site.

Episode 122: Parkland Student Activism and Political Emotion with Kathleen Knight Abowitz & Dan Mamlok

In Episode 122, Dan and Michael offer condolences to the recent victims of mass shootings and talk with Kathleen Knight Abowitz and Dan Mamlok about their new article published in Theory & Research in Social Education, “The case of #NeverAgainMSD: When proceduralist civics becomes public work by way of political emotion.”

Subscribe on iTunes Subscribe to Stitcher

Episode 122

Books, Articles and Other Amazing Resources

  1. Knight Abowitz, K., & Mamlok, D. (2019). The case of #NeverAgainMSD: When proceduralist civics becomes public work by way of political emotion. Theory & Research in Social Education, 47(2), 155-175.
  2. Please read, A Response to Mass Shootings from NCSS, which Kathleen Knight Abowitz, Dan Mamlok, and our own Dan Krutka helped write alongside the CUFA and NCSS boards.
  3. Check out our previous episode on Dewey!: Episode 70: John Dewey & Social Studies with Daniel Stuckart

Biographies

Kathleen Knight Abowitz is a professor of philosophy and social foundations of education in the Department of Educational Leadership in the College of Education, Health, and Society at Miami University of Ohio. Prior to coming to Miami, I helped create a service-learning program with students at the University of Mary Washington in Fredericksberg, Virginia (my home state!).  My research areas include democratic education, governance, and leadership issues in P-16 education. My work appears in leading peer-reviewed national and international journals such as Review of Educational Research, American Educational Research Journal, Teachers College Record, Journal of Teacher Education, Educational Policy, Phi Delta Kappan, and Educational Theory. You can download some of my published work here. I participate in public school activism, as a citizen of Ohio, through the Ohio Public School Advocacy Network.

Dan Mamlok is a Horizon Postdoctoral Fellow under the aegis of Concordia’s Early Childhood and Elementary Education program, the UNESCO Co-Chair in the Prevention of Radicalisation and Violent Extremism, and the federally funded SOMEONE Project. He holds a PhD in Educational Leadership, Culture, and Curriculum from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. His dissertation, Digital Technology and Education in the Age of Globalization, explored social and cultural aspects of integrating technology and education, and specifically dealt with questions regarding democracy, education, and citizenship. His research at Concordia University elaborates on some of the themes discussed in his dissertation, and specifically examines the influences of digitized play worlds on young children and the ways in which they forge their identity, with the aim of developing resilience against hate speech. Beyond his interests in educational technologies and sociocultural studies in education, his research interests include philosophy of education, democracy and education, and aesthetic education.

Episode 118: Elementary Social Studies Education Summit Review

In episode 118, Dan talks with planners and presenters at the first annual Elementary Social Studies Education Summit (ESSES) that took place in Wilmington, North Carolina on June 6th and 7th, 2019.

Subscribe on iTunes Subscribe to Stitcher

Episode 118- Elementary Social Studies Education Summit

Books, Articles and Other Amazing Resources

  1. Check out the ESSES website for more on sessions, participants, and more: https://esses19.wordpress.com/
    1. Guests include (in order): the planners, Sohyun An, Sarah Shear, Noreen Naseem Rodriguez, Sara Demoiny, Rebecca Christ, Noreen Naseem Rodriguez (again!), Shanedra Nowell and Chris Fisher, Noreen and Sarah talking about the new journal, and finally Noreen’s keynote to finish!
    2. Here are the keynote and pre-summit speakers: https://esses19.wordpress.com/keynote-speakers/
    3. Here are resources from presenters at #ESSES19
  2. Here’s the website for the new journal introduced at the conference, The Critical Social Educator: https://www.iastatedigitalpress.com/tcse/
  3. Big thanks to the ESSES organizers: Lisa Brown Buchanan of University of North Carolina-Wilmington, Elizabeth Bellows of Appalachian State University, Elizabeth Saylor of the University of Georgia, Sarah B. Shear of the University of Washington Bothell, and Christina Tschida of East Carolina University! And here’s the 2018 book they edited: (Re)imagining elementary social studies: A controversial issues reader.
  4. Here’s a selection of previous elementary social studies episodes and episodes with ESSES participants:
    1. Episode 64: Elementary Social Studies with Anne-Lise Halvorsen
    2. Episode 76: Teaching Asian-American Histories with Noreen Naseem Rodriguez
    3. Episode 79: Black Critical Patriotism in Elementary Social Studies with Chris Busey & Irenea Walker
    4. Episode 84: Inquiry in Elementary Education with Emma Thacker, Erin Casey, Katie Knapp, & Carly Muetterties
    5. Episode 95: Affirming Indigenous Sovereignty with Sarah Shear, Leilani Sabzalian, & Lisa Brown Buchanan
    6. Episode 112: Welcoming Diverse Families in the Elementary Classroom with Selena Van Horn & Andrea Hawkman
    7. Episode 116: Indigenous Counterstories on an Elementary Field Trip with Harper Keenan
  5. While you can listen to former guest Dr. Noreen Naseem Rodriguez’s full keynote at the end of this episode, you can also listen and watch here:

Biography

The inaugural elementary social studies education summit, hosted by the University of North Carolina-Wilmington, will bring researchers and teacher educators together in two days of collaborative learning! Use the navigation links above to access information about the call for proposals, featured speakers, and more! You can follow them on Twitter at @esses2019.