Episode 39: Supporting Transgender Students with Amber Briggle and Genevieve Ma’yet

In episode 39, Dan and Michael chat with Amber Briggle and Genevieve Mayet about supporting transgender students.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Above is Amber Briggle speaking at a TEDx event about her son MG.
  2. Equality Texas works to ensure equality for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Texans through political action, education, community organizing, and collaboration.
  3. Trans-Cendence International is an organization that Genevieve Mayet spoke of that highlights discussion among people who are transgender and allies.
  4. Check out Genevieve on Facebook and YouTube at “GregariousGen: A Safe Place to get Answers and More”
  5. You can read about the Briggle family hosting the Texas Attorney General HERE. and their visit to the White House HERE.
  6. Anna Leach’s 2016 article, ‘It’s all about democracy’: inside gender neutral schools in Sweden, offers ideas about approaching gender in schools: http://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/2016/feb/02/swedish-schools-gender-alien-concept
  7. Carrie Kilman’s 2013 article, “The gender spectrum” from Teaching Tolerance (44) provides a nice overview of terminology discussed in the podcast. You can access it here:  http://www.tolerance.org/gender-spectrum;
  8. Also, Sam Killermann’s “The genderbread person, v. 3.3.”also reviews terminology and can be found here: http://itspronouncedmetrosexual.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/Breaking-through-the-Binary-by-Sam-Killermann.pdf;
  9. Teaching Tolerance also address “Six Myths about Transgender Identity” in their article found here: http://www.tolerance.org/blog/dispelling-six-myths-about-transgender-identity
  10. Story of Dallas parents’ concerns for transgender daughter after Trump administration axed rights from Obama administration: http://www.dallasnews.com/news/lgbt/2017/02/27/parents-dallas-transgender-girl-worry-political-actions
  11. Finally, let’s start and finish with a TED Talk. Batya Greenwald’s “What kindergarteners taught me about gender” is a good watch:

Contact 

Amber Briggle is a parent, activist, and small business owner. If you’re in north Texas, you can get a massage at her business – Soma Denton! Or you can tweet her @mrsbriggle.

Genevieve Mayet is pursuing a graduate education degree and has a background in science. You can tweet her @GregariouGen.

Episode 38: Special Education with Kathleen Kyzar

In episode 38, Dan and Michael chat with Kathleen Kyzar who provides an overview of special education.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

Note: Beyond just what was mentioned in the podcast, Dr. Kyzar shared a number of additional special education resources that educators may find useful. 

  1. The Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) is the flagship professional organization for special educators focused on practice-related issues: https://www.cec.sped.org/
  2. CEC has a number of special interest divisions and Dr. Kyzar referenced transition services (ages 16+ nationally, ages 14+ in Texas). Learn more here on the CEC division dedicated to transition issues in the field of special education: http://community.cec.sped.org/dcdt/home
  3. CAST (comprehensive resource on UDL): http://www.cast.org/
  4. The IRIS Center (http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/) out of Vanderbilt Peabody College & Claremont Graduate University: free, online modules and case activities on a number of special education topics including 60 modules on accommodations and an additional 63 on differentiated instruction. This link takes you directly to the resource locator for the modules: http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/iris-resource-locator/
  5. The Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR) (http://www.parentcenterhub.org/) includes user-friendly summaries on a wide variety of topics in the field of special education, including topics Dr. Kyzar discussed on the podcast. Here is the link directly to the resources: http://www.parentcenterhub.org/resources/
  6. CPIR assumed all the old NICHCY resources, which were created under a grant-funded project (that ran to the end of its funding course as of Oct 2013) designed to provide information about special education to stakeholders in an accessible way; here is the link to the NICHCY warehouse and since IDEA has not yet been re-authorized, the resources here are still relatively current: http://www.parentcenterhub.org/nichcy-resources/
  7.  Christmas in Purgatory is aa well-known book in the intellectual disability community by Burton Blatt and Fred Kaplan. Here is a link to the photographic essay: http://www.disabilitymuseum.org/dhm/lib/catcard.html?id=1782
  8. Norman Kunc, who has cerebral palsy and speaks publicly on his experiences with a physical disability, has a powerful video in which he reflects on what his life could have been like if he had been sent to an institution as his parents were advised to do:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2OxpzPybT4

  9. On inclusion: Including Samuel is an engaging documentary: http://www.includingsamuel.com/film
  10. Lois Barrett’s 2013 article, “Seamless teaching: Navigating the inclusion spectrum” from Teaching Tolerance offers a good review of key special education ideas.
  11. Want to learn more about IDEA? Check out this video, “Celebrating 35 Years of IDEA” from the U.S. Department of Education:

Contact 

Dr. Kathleen Kyzar is an Assistant Professor of Early Childhood Education in the College of Education at Texas Christian University. She teaches courses on early childhood programming, family-school partnerships, and pedagogy for the young child and her research interests include family-professional partnerships and family support, family quality of life, and inclusive early childhood programming. You can view her scholarship on Google Scholar, ResearchGate, or contact her @KathleenKyzar.

Episode 37: Leadership Development & the Importance of Space

In episode 37, Dan and Michael chat with Dr. Max Klau about leadership development and the importance of creating dedicated spaces for reflection.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Max left some book recommendations!
    1. If you’re interested in learning more about Adaptive Leadership, check out Leadership Without East Answers by Ronald Heifetz.
    2. If you’re interested in learning more about leadership in living systems, check out Leadership and the New Science by Margaret Wheatley.
    3. If you’re interested in Joseph Campbell and the Hero’s Journey, check out his book The Hero With A Thousand Faces.
  2. Throughout the episode, we discussed City Year! City Year is an AmeriCorps program where 17 – 24 year olds spend a year in service working in schools around the country. Michael did two years of service as an AmeriCorps Member in Cleveland and became a staff member in Rhode Island. Check out their website for more information.
    1. If you’re interested in City Year’s approach to leadership development, click here.
  3. If you’d like to learn more about the New Politics Leadership Academy, click here.
  4. To learn more about the New Politics Leadership Academy Answering the Call program, click here.
  5. As our ideas for podcast episodes often stem from previous episodes, check out the two that inspired this one.
    1. Episode 16: Mentoring for retention with Destiny Warrior
    2. Episode 28: Supporting New Teachers with Lisa Dabbs

Contact 

Max Klau received his doctorate from the Harvard School of Education and now the Chief Program Officer at New Politics Leadership Academy, a nonprofit ‘dedicated to creating opportunities for service veterans to engage in policy and politics.’ Before that he was the Vice President of Leadership Development, Inc (where Michael met him!!). Check out some of his writing at the Huffington Post!

Episode 36: High-Stakes Testing & the Manufactured Crisis with David Berliner

In episode 36, Dan and Michael chat with educational psychologist and researcher David Berliner about high-stakes testing and the manufactured crisis.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. You can find detailed biographies with links to his work on the National Education Policy Center site and his Arizona State University page, or read the published one that David referenced in the episode:
    Berliner, D. C. (2016, May 11). An unanticipated successful career and some lessons learned. In S. Tobias, J. D. Fletcher, & D. Berliner (Series Eds.), Acquired Wisdom Series. Education Review, 23. Retrieved from: http://edrev.asu.edu/index.php/ER/article/view/2078/567
  2. Berliner, D. C., & Biddle, B. J. (1995). The manufactured crisis. New York: Addison-Wesley. (Published also by Harper Collins and Perseus Books) Purchase on Amazon
  3. Nichols, S. N. & Berliner, D. C. (2007). Collateral Damage: The effects of high-stakes testing on America’s schools. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press. Purchase on Amazon.
  4. Berliner, D. C. & Glass, G. V. (2014). 50 Myths and Lies That Threaten America’s Public Schools: The Real Crisis in Education. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.  Purchase on Amazon.

Contact 

David C. Berliner is Regents’ Professor of Education Emeritus at Arizona State University. He is a member of the National Academy of Education, the International Academy of Education, and a past president of both the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and the Division of Educational Psychology of the American Psychological Association (APA). Professor Berliner has authored more than 200 published articles, chapters and books. Among his best known works is the book co-authored with B. J. Biddle, The manufactured crisis, and the book co-authored with Sharon Nichols, Collateral damage: How high-stakes testing corrupts American education. His most recent book, 50 Myths and Lies that Threaten America’s Public Schools, was co-authored with Gene V Glass and students, and published in March, 2014. You can contact him via at berliner@asu.edu or on Twitter @

Episode 35: Media Literacy & Fake News with Renee Hobbs and Annie Jansen

In episode 35, Michael and Dan chat with past guest Renee Hobbs and AP Government teacher Annie Jansen about Media Literacy and fake news.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Renee Hobbs is the Director of the the Media Education Lab (mediaeducationlab.com) which advances the practice of media literacy education through scholarship and community services. At the website, you can find multimedia curriculum resources, F2F and fully online professional development, and published research that examines the impact of digital and media literacy education.
  2. Renee’s “Credible or Incredible” lesson plan is available as a PDF, part of Assignment: Media Literacy, a comprehensive K-12 curriculum on media literacy developed by Renee Hobbs for the Maryland State Department of Education with support from Discovery Communications: http://mediaeducationlab.com/secondary-school-unit-2-who-do-you-trust; Here’s the link to the PDF that’s at the top right hand corner of the screen: http://mediaeducationlab.com/sites/mediaeducationlab.com/files/AML_H_unit2.pdf
  3. Check out an NPR interview with Professor Sam Wineburg from Stanford University  about his study about students and fake news.
  4. Renne Hobbs is no stranger to Visions of Education! Check out Episode 7: Propaganda with Renee Hobbs!
  5. Annie recommends the following sites:
    1. Fake or Real? How to self check the news and get the facts by Wynne Davis (NPR): http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2016/12/05/503581220/fake-or-real-how-to-self-check-the-news-and-get-the-facts (Scholarly Article)
    2. Critical Media Literacy is Not and Option By Douglas Kellner and Jeff Share (UCLA) https://pages.gseis.ucla.edu/faculty/kellner/essays/2007_Kellner-Share_CML-is-not-Option.pdf (Scholarly Article)
    3. Transforming Teaching and Learning Through Critical Media Literacy Pedagogy: http://www.learninglandscapes.ca/images/documents/ll-no12/garcia.pdf (Scholarly Article)
    4. Online module Annie and Nate Bowling are using for her media unit: https://tps10-my.sharepoint.com/personal/ngibbs_tacoma_k12_wa_us/_layouts/15/WopiFrame.aspx?guestaccesstoken=9x5NuyCIH%2bx%2fGfwhWFo5%2bO5R%2fzG%2bRhNfVzahwb%2bAA78%3d&folderid=0b245acca13d64f2e902d7c3cfc9960e6&action=view

Contact 

Renee Hobbs is Professor of Communication Studies and Director of the Media Education Lab at the University of Rhode Island.  You can contact her on Twitter @reneehobbs or check out her website… you’ll become more media literate just from visiting it.

Annie Jansen teaches AP Government and Politics in the state of Washington. You can contact her on Twitter!

Episode 34: Teacher Activism with Shawn Sheehan

In episode 34, Dan and Michael talk with 2016 Oklahoma Teacher of the Year about teacher activism, including his non-profit Teach Like Me and his run for the state Senate.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Visit Teach Like Me at TeachLikeMe.org
  2. You can learn more about Shawn’s work at ShawnSheehan.com and make sure to read Shawn’s post-election blog post, “Lessons From a Teacher Who Ran For Office.”
  3. To learn more about teacher’s frustration in Oklahoma, the “teacher’s caucus” of 31 Oklahoma teachers who ran for legislative seats, and the election results where 7 of 31 teachers won their elections, read these stories from episode 29 guest, education reporter Ben Felder.

Contact

Shawn Sheehan is a special education math teacher at Norman High School. You can contact him on his website or tweet at him @SPSheehan on Twitter.

 

Episode 33: Teaching In Virtual Environments with Chris Hitchcock

In episode 33, Dan and Michael chat with Chris Hitchcock about teaching in virtual environments!

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Episode 30: Virtual Communities and Co-learning with Howard Rheingold
    1. Chris mentioned that she learned much from our discussion with Howard Rheingold. In fact, it was this episode that inspired us to get a classroom teacher
  2. Episode 13: Creating Authentic Media with hosts Dan and Michael
    1. Dan referenced this episode to discuss how he teaches in his online course.
  3. The SAMR model
    1. Dan referenced the SAMR model which was developed by Dr. Ruben Puentedura. The link about if a video of Dr. Puentedura discussing the model!
  4. What is TPACK? 
    1. I found this journal article entitled ‘What is Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK)? As the article title amused me, I thought that this would be the article that I would share.
  5. Dan and his students created something neat about the importance of learning people’s names! Check it out.
  6. Check out the podcast that Chris is a part of – Talking Social Studies!

Contact

Chris Hitchcock teaches world history at an online school. She is also a co-moderator of #sschat, a social studies focused Twitter group. And she was also recently awarded with the Jacobs Educator Award for her contributions to integrating technology with classroom learning. She will probably blush because we put this here. You can contact her via Twitter at @CHitch94.

Episode 32: A Reflection on the 2016 Presidential Election with Nate Bowling & Chris Hitchcock

In a free-ranging panel discussion about how the Presidential election 0f 2016 has impacted their classrooms, Michael and Dan are joined by former guest Nate Bowling and upcoming guest Chris Hitchcock.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Check out episode 26 where we chat with Nate about school equity and resources.
  2. Check out episode 33 (upcoming) with guest Chris Hitchcock!
  3. Nate’s approach to helping his students digest the 2016 election was recently highlighted by King 5 (an NBC affiliate).
  4. Nate was also featured on his local NPR station discussing the impact of the election.
  5. Want to learn about Nate’s approach to teaching government? Check out this piece from KUOW.org!
  6. You can find more about Nate’s work on his site: http://www.natebowling.com/

Contact

Nate Bowling currently teaches AP Government and Human Geography at Lincoln High in the Tacoma School District in Washington state. You can contact him on Twitter at @Nate_Bowling.

Chris Hitchcock teaches world history at an online school. She is also a co-moderator of #sschat, a social studies focused Twitter group. And she was also recently awarded with the Jacobs Educator Award for her contributions to integrating technology with classroom learning. She will probably blush because we put this here. You can contact her via Twitter at @CHitch94.

Episode 31: Oral Histories in Education with Gabriele Abowd Damico

In episode 31, Dan and Michael talk Oral Histories in Education with Gabriele Abowd Damico of Indiana University.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Learn more about the INSPIRE Living-Learning Center on their site: inspire.iu.edu; And here’s a video of INSPIRE’s director and friend of the show James Damico talking about INSPIRE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LDfrLQqRX-c
  2. Voices in Time oral histories project “focuses on listening to and documenting the voices and experiences of leading educators across Indiana who have made a substantial educational impact on the lives of children, youth, or adults”: inspire.indiana.edu/voices-in-time
  3. Learn more about the Armstrong Teachers: education.indiana.edu/license-development/development/armstrong/index.html
  4. Learn more about the Harmony Myer Institute for Democracy and Equity in Education: news.indiana.edu/releases/iu/2015/03/harmony-meier-institute.shtml
  5. The Community of Teachers Program at IU “is designed to foster long-term relationships between fellow teachers and faculty members and prepare students to collaborate with fellow teachers in their professional lives.” Learn more: http://education.indiana.edu/undergraduate/programs/secondary/secondary-cot.html
  6. More about Fulbright teachers at IU: http://news.indiana.edu/releases/iu/2016/09/fulbright-teachers.shtml
  7. Fresh Air with Terry Gross: http://www.npr.org/programs/fresh-air/

So, in short, they’re doing lots of cool stuff at IU’s School of Education.

Contact

Gabriele Abowd Damico is a clinical Assistant Professor in Art Education and the Community of Teachers Program at Indiana University – Bloomington. You can contact her at gabowd@indiana.edu.

Episode 30: Virtual Communities and Co-learning with Howard Rheingold

In episode 30, Dan and Michael talk Virtual Communities, co-learning, and more with the great Howard Rheingold.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. You can find a cornucopia of Howard Rheingold resources and work on his website, Rheingold.com, including his books:
    1. The Virtual Community (1993)
    2. Smart Mobs (2002)
    3. Net Smart (2012)
  2. Howard mentiond educational theorists John Dewey, Paulo Freire, Maria Montessori who advocated for student empowerment.
  3. Howard also mentions John Taylor Gatto and Ivan Illich as theorists who have critiqued how students learn to do school.
  4. The Digital Media and Learning Research Hub hosts a website and a conference annually to “advance research in the service of a more equitable, participatory, and effective ecosystem of learning keyed to the digital and networked era.”
  5. This short article previews key ideas from Howard’s book Net Smart: Rheingold, H. (2010). Attention, and Other 21st-Century Social Media Literacies. Educause Review, 45(5), 14-24. The five social media literacies Howard discusses in the article and book are:
    1. Attention
    2. Participation
    3. Collaboration
    4. Network Awareness
    5. Critical Consumption or Crap Detection
  6. Is Google Making Us Stupid?” by Nicholas Carr in The Atlantic (2008)
  7. Twitter Literacy (I refuse to make up a Twittery name for it)” by Howard Rheingold in SFGate.com (05.11.09)

Contact

According to his Wikipedia page, Howard Rheingold is a critic, writer, and teacher; his specialties are on the cultural, social and political implications of modern communication media such as the Internet, mobile telephony and virtual communities (a term he is credited with inventing).You can tweet @hrheingold, follow him on Facebook, and find all his work and books on Rheingold.com.