Episode 47: Global Read Aloud with Pernille Ripp

In episode 47, Michael & Dan chat with Pernille Ripp about teaching, being connected, and the Global Read Aloud. 

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Information about the Social Studies Chat book club that Dan & Michael spoke can be found on the SSChat Book Club Facebook page! You can still participate in our reading of Kenneth C. Davis’s In the Shadow of Liberty and make use of the resources and author interviews!
  2. The Global Read Aloud that Pernille Ripp started can be found here! Learn more and sign up!

Contact

Pernille Ripp teaches 7th grade in Wisconsin. She is an blogger, thinker, creator, and all around great educator! She has also written three books with one more on the way- check them out! Learn more about her on her blog and/or follow her on Twitter!

Episode 46: Women in Education History with Jenn Binis of EdHistory101

In episode 46, Dan and Michael chat about women in education history with Jenn Binis of EdHistory101.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. First and foremost, make sure to check Jenn and her husband Paul on the EdHistory101 podcast on iTunes and their site, shownotes, and daily tweet threads at https://edhistory101.com/
  2. Jenn and Dan highly recommend Goldstein, D. (2014). The teacher wars: A history of America’s most embattled profession. New York, NY: Doubleday.
  3. Hoffman, Nancy. Woman’s” true” profession: Voices from the history of teaching. Harvard Education Press. 8 Story Street First Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, 2003.
  4. Lerner, Gerda. Teaching women’s history. Vol. 162, no. 1. Amer Historical Assn, 1981.
  5. Learn more about Nannie Burroughs (1883-1961) who was an African-American educator, orator, religious leader, civil rights activist, feminist and businesswoman who founded the National Training School for Women and Girls in Washington, DC in 1909.
  6. Learn more about Maria Childs (1802 – 1880), an American abolitionist, women’s rights activist, Native American rights activist, novelist, journalist, and more.
  7. Learn more about Sarah Roberts and Roberts v. City of Boston in the book Kendrick, S., & Kendrick, P. (2004). Sarah’s long walk: The free Blacks of Boston and how their struggle for equality changed America. Beacon Press; Or watch the following clip from School: The story of American public education on the case. Citation: Patton, S. & Mondale, S. (Producers), & Mondale, S. (Director). (2001). School: The Story of American Public Education [Documentary] . United States: Stone Lantern Films. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL00795BC38B4368D4
  8. Check out Nikole Hannah-Jones’ work on resegregation: http://nikolehannahjones.com/.
  9. More on Maria Montessori (1870-1952)
  10. More on Oberlin College and black history
  11. More on Charlotte Hawkins Brown (1883–1961)
  12. More on Ella Flagg Young (1845-1918)
  13. More on Bridgette Peixotto (1879-1972)
  14. More on Anna Julia Cooper and her biography, A Voice from the South
  15. This Talk by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie on why we should all be feminists:

16. This TED Talk by Kimberlé Crenshaw discusses Intersectionality:

Contact

Jenn Binis has a blog at jennbbinis.com and a podcast with shownotes at edhistory101.com. You can tweet at her @JennBinis or @EdHistory101.

Episode 45: Protect Public Ed with Five 2016 State Teachers of the Year

In episode 45, Michael & Dan chat with five 2016 Teachers of the Year -Tayla Edlund, Ashley Lamb Sinclair, Ryan Kaiser, Audrey Jackson & Time Royers – about their organization and the need to ‘Protect Public Ed.’

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Check out the organization the 2016 State Teachers of the Year are putting together called Protect Public Ed.
    1. You can also like their Facebook page!
  2. This is the video that the 2016 Teachers of the Year put together
  3. You can read the article written by Aubrey Lamb-Sinclair about her experience taking an Uber to a Teacher of the Year event entitled “Teacher of the Year asks: Can we stop denigrating teachers now?
  4. Listen to our episode Episode 36: High-Stakes Testing & the Manufactured Crisis with David Berliner to learn more about high-stakes testing!
  5. Listen to our episode Episode 42: Betsy DeVos & School Choice with Allie Gross to learn more about the impact school choice has had in Michigan (particularly Detroit).

 

Contact

Talya Edlund teaches fifth grade in Cape Elizabeth, Maine. She is Maine’s 2016 Teacher of the Year. She also is a former College Adjunct at Southern Maine Community College.

Ashley Lamb-Sinclair teacher high school English and Creative Writing at North Oldham High School in Kentucky. She is Kentucky’s 2016 Teacher of the Year. She also is a contributing writer for the Atlantic and the Washington Post.

Ryan Kaiser teachers middle school social studies in Baltimore, Maryland.  He is Maryland’s 2016 Teacher of the Year. He is also the communications director of the Maryland Social Studies Council, coaches debate team (coaching his team to the championship) and founded the Baltimore Environmental Explorers Camp.

Audrey Jackson teacher fifth grade inclusion in Boston, Massachusetts. She is the 2016 Massachusetts Teacher of the Year. She was also the teacher representative for ESSA Negotiated Rulemaking at the US Department of Education.

Tim Royers teacher high school social studies in Omaha, Nebraska. He is the 2016 Nebraska Teacher of the year. He also serves as the Chief Negotiated of the Millard Education Association.

 

Episode 44: Answering Teacher Candidate Questions

In episode 44, our panel of educators answer the questions of teacher candidates from Betsy Barrow’s class at the University of North Carolina.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. For this episode, we will add tweets to our shownotes that use the hashtag #MyAdviceForNewTeachers:

  1. Per the Betsy DeVos question, this Education Week article titled, “What Could Betsy DeVos Really Get Done as Education Secretary?” might be of use.
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Contact
Chris Hitchcock (@CHitch94) is an award-winning  world history teacher at an online school in Indiana, a #sschat co-moderator of #sschat , and our episode 33 guest on Teaching in Virtual Environments. Destiny Warrior (@destinylwarrior) is a classroom teacher in Mid-Del schools, an adjunct instructor at the University of Oklahoma, and our episode 16 guest on Mentoring for Retention. And Betsy Barrow (@betsybarrow) is a former high school teacher, doctoral candidate, and UNC instructor.

Episode 43: Student-led Conferences with Cathy Whitehead

In episode 43, Michael and Dan interview 2016 Tennessee Teacher of the Year Cathy Whitehead on student-led conferences.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Brandt, S. (2003). What parents really want out of parent-teacher conferences. Kappa Delta Pi Record, 39(4), 160-163.
  2. Culver, L., & Cousino, G. (2000). Building a partnership. Schools in the Middle, 9(5), 12-15.
  3. Hackmann, D. (1995, Nov.). Student-led conferences: Encouraging student-parent academic discussions. Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the National Middle School Association, New Orleans, LA. Retrieved from eric.ed.gov/?id=ED388449
  4. Hackmann, D., Kenworthy, J., & Nibbelink, S. (1998). Student empowerment through student-led conferences. Middle School Journal, 30(1), 35-39.
  5. Kinney, P. (2012). Student-led conferences support learning. Principal Leadership, 13(3), 55-57.
  6. Stiggins, R. J., & Chappuis, J. (2005). Using student-involved classroom assessment to close achievement gaps. Theory into Practice, 44(1), 11-18.
  7. Tuinstra, C., & Hiatt-Michael, D. (2004). Student-led parent conferences in middle schools. School Community Journal, 14(1), 59-80.
  8. Find more on Steven Covey’s The Leader in Me, which Cathy mentioned, on the website: http://www.theleaderinme.org/the-leader-in-me-book/
  9. Additionally, articles and peer-reviewed research about student-led conferences can be found at edutopia.org .
  10. Note: Cathy wants to send a big thank you to Cheryl Lambert, data and instructional coach at West Carroll SSD in Trezevant, Tennessee, for sharing her publication research.
  11. One of Dan’s favorite articles on democratic education details student-led students conferences in addition to including students in all aspects of teaching and learning: Brodhagen, B. (1995). The situation made us special. In M. W. Apple & J. A. Beane’s Democratic schools, 83-100. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Contact
Cathy Whitehead is a third-grade teacher in rural West Tennessee and the 2016 Tennessee Teacher of the Year. You can read her blog at readrunteach.blogspot.com or chat with her on Twitter @CathyWhitehead1.

Episode 42: Betsy DeVos & School Choice with Allie Gross

In episode 42, Michael and Dan interview education journalist and former teacher Allie Gross on what we can learn from Betsy DeVos and school choice in Michigan.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Clip of Tim Kaine questioning Betsy DeVos at her confirmation hearing that we discussed in the beginning of the episode.
  2. Gross, A. (2017, January 13th). Besty Devos’s Accountability Problem.The Atlantic.
  3. Gross, A. (2016, December 19th). Out of optionsVICE. (This is the primary article we discuss on the gutting of Detroit’s public schools due to school choice)
  4. How Trump’s education nominee bent Detroit to her will on charter schoolsNew York Times.
  5. Gross, A. (2016, June 8). Detroit school legislation backed by charter advocates was years in the makingDetriot Metro Times.
  6. Gross, A. (2014, July 14). The charter school profiteersJacobin. (This article details the charter school Allie taught at and discussed in the episode) 
  7. You can find more on Allie’s work on her site – allisongross.com
  8. Bonus episode 34 connection: Betsy DeVos helped fund opposition to the “Teacher’s Caucus” in Oklahoma, including friend of the podcast and Oklahoma Teacher of the Year Shawn Sheehan

Contact 

Per her website, Allie Gross is a freelance journalist based in Detroit. Her work has appeared in Jacobin, VICE, Slate, GOOD, the Atlantic, FiveThirtyEight and Mother Jones. Prior to pursuing a career in journalism. Allie worked as a 5th-grade teacher in Detroit, where she co-founded Detroit Charter Data a website aiming to bring accountability, transparency, and coherency to the city’s education landscape. You can connect with her on twitter (@allie_elisabeth) or via email (allison.elisabeth@gmail.com).

Episode 41: Educating Refugee and Immigrant Youth with Mandy Stewart

In episode 41, Dan and Michael interview Mandy Stewart of Texas Woman’s University on educating refugee and immigrant youth.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. You can learn more about Lau v. Nichols (1974) on Oyey.org.
  2. Stewart, M. A., & Walker, K. (2016). English as a Second Language and World War II: Possibilities for Language and Historical Learning. TESOL Journal.
  3. Stewart, M. A., & Hansen-Thomas, H. (2016). Sanctioning a Space for Translanguaging in the Secondary English Classroom: A Case of a Transnational Youth. Research in the Teaching of English, 50(4), 450.
  4. Stewart, M. A. (2016). Nurturing Caring Relationships through Five Simple Rules. English Journal, 105(3), 22-28.
  5. Stewart, M. A. (2015). My Journey of Hope and Peace. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 59(2), 149-159.
  6. Stewart, M. A. (2013). Giving voice to Valeria’s story: Support, value, and agency for immigrant adolescents. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 57(1), 42-50.
  7. Menken, K. (2013). Emergent bilingual students in secondary school: Along the academic language and literacy continuum. Language Teaching, 46(04), 438-476.
  8. This site out of Colorado has resources on special populations, including “newcomer students,” “students with interrupted formal education,” “unaccompanied children & youth, ” “refugee students,” “migrant farmworker students & families,” “internationally adopted students,”and “long-term ELLs”: http://www.colorincolorado.org/ell-basics/special-populations
  9. In 2017, Teaching Tolerance released  “Immigrant and Refugee Children: A Guide for Educators and School Support Staff”: http://www.tolerance.org/magazine/number-55-spring-2017/feature/immigrant-and-refugee-children-guide-educators-and-school-su

Contact 

Dr. Mandy Stewart has taught with elementary and middle school English learners in addition to teaching adult English as a Second Language and Spanish classes. Her research interests include leveraging the out-of-school literacies of adolescent English learners to promote academic success.  She is also interested in multilingual and multicultural literature that honors students’ cultural and language backgrounds.  You may read more about Dr. Stewart’s professional work on her website, tweet her @DrMandyStewart, or check out research on Google Scholar .

Episode 40: The Social Studies Wars with Ron Evans

In episode 40, Dan and Michael interview Ron Evans of San Diego State University on the history of the social studies.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Evans, R. W. (2004). The social studies wars: What should we teach the children?. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.
  2. For more on the issues-centered approach in the social studies see: Evans, R. W., & Saxe, D. W. (1996). Handbook on Teaching Social Issues. NCSS Bulletin 93. National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS).
  3. Hertzberg, H. W. (1981). Social Studies Reform 1880-1980. Boulder, CO: SSEC Publications.
  4. The 1892 report Ron mentioned is the National Education Association’s “History Ten” (part of NEA’s “Committee of Ten”) chaired by Charles Kendall Adams which also included Woodrow Wilson, James Harvey Robinson and others. It was published in 1894.
  5. The American Historical Association’s (AHA) Committee of Seven met in 1899 and was similar to the History Ten, but pushed traditional history movement into secondary schools. It was much more highly adopted and recommended “four blocks” of history instruction: ancient, medieval, modern, and American. It sought to train students in the art of thinking historically
  6. In 1916, the NEA’s Committee on the Social Studies (part of NEA’s Commission on the Reorganization of Secondary Education) met and was headed by Sociologist Jesse James; It recommended a compromise between history and issues-centered social studies with the Problems of Democracy Course (POD) best representing the latter.
  7. Evans, R. W. (2007). This happened in America: Harold Rugg and the censure of social studies. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Press.
  8. The Council for Basic Education that Authur Bestor helped to found closed its doors in 2004 due to lack of funding.
  9. Jerome Bruner’s most influential work is his 1960 book, The process of education.
  10. Wikipedia has a short summary of Man: A Course of Study (MACOS), the Education Development Center maintains MACOSonline.org, and there’s even a documentary film about MACOS called “Through These Eyes“.
  11. Oliver, D. W., & Shaver, J. P. (1966). Teaching public issues in the high school. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin.
  12. Writings helped lead to reform and included Rudolf Flesch’s 1955 book Why Johnny Can’t Read and then eventually accountability-reform with the National Commission on Education’s “A Nationa at Risk” report.
  13. Evans, R. W. (2014). Schooling corporate citizens: How accountability reform has damaged civic education and undermined democracy. New York, NY: Routledge.
  14. See Episode 36 for more on David Berliner’s contention that the American educational crisis is simply a “Manufactured Crisis”
  15. You can learn more about the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) for social studies teachers and the university-level social studies organization College and University Faculty Assembly (CUFA).

Contact 

Ron Evans is a leading authority on social studies and curriculum history. He is a Professor in the School of Teacher Education at San Diego State University. You can find more info about him and his work on his site RonaldWEvans.wordpress.com, buy his books on his Amazon author page, and you can friend him on Facebook for more updates.

Episode 39: Supporting Transgender Students with Amber Briggle and Genevieve Ma’yet

In episode 39, Dan and Michael chat with Amber Briggle and Genevieve Mayet about supporting transgender students.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Above is Amber Briggle speaking at a TEDx event about her son MG.
  2. Equality Texas works to ensure equality for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Texans through political action, education, community organizing, and collaboration.
  3. Trans-Cendence International is an organization that Genevieve Mayet spoke of that highlights discussion among people who are transgender and allies.
  4. Check out Genevieve on Facebook and YouTube at “GregariousGen: A Safe Place to get Answers and More”
  5. You can read about the Briggle family hosting the Texas Attorney General HERE. and their visit to the White House HERE.
  6. Anna Leach’s 2016 article, ‘It’s all about democracy’: inside gender neutral schools in Sweden, offers ideas about approaching gender in schools: http://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/2016/feb/02/swedish-schools-gender-alien-concept
  7. Carrie Kilman’s 2013 article, “The gender spectrum” from Teaching Tolerance (44) provides a nice overview of terminology discussed in the podcast. You can access it here:  http://www.tolerance.org/gender-spectrum;
  8. Also, Sam Killermann’s “The genderbread person, v. 3.3.”also reviews terminology and can be found here: http://itspronouncedmetrosexual.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/Breaking-through-the-Binary-by-Sam-Killermann.pdf;
  9. Teaching Tolerance also address “Six Myths about Transgender Identity” in their article found here: http://www.tolerance.org/blog/dispelling-six-myths-about-transgender-identity
  10. Story of Dallas parents’ concerns for transgender daughter after Trump administration axed rights from Obama administration: http://www.dallasnews.com/news/lgbt/2017/02/27/parents-dallas-transgender-girl-worry-political-actions
  11. Finally, let’s start and finish with a TED Talk. Batya Greenwald’s “What kindergarteners taught me about gender” is a good watch:

Contact 

Amber Briggle is a parent, activist, and small business owner. If you’re in north Texas, you can get a massage at her business – Soma Denton! Or you can tweet her @mrsbriggle.

Genevieve Mayet is pursuing a graduate education degree and has a background in science. You can tweet her @GregariouGen.

Episode 38: Special Education with Kathleen Kyzar

In episode 38, Dan and Michael chat with Kathleen Kyzar who provides an overview of special education.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

Note: Beyond just what was mentioned in the podcast, Dr. Kyzar shared a number of additional special education resources that educators may find useful. 

  1. The Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) is the flagship professional organization for special educators focused on practice-related issues: https://www.cec.sped.org/
  2. CEC has a number of special interest divisions and Dr. Kyzar referenced transition services (ages 16+ nationally, ages 14+ in Texas). Learn more here on the CEC division dedicated to transition issues in the field of special education: http://community.cec.sped.org/dcdt/home
  3. CAST (comprehensive resource on UDL): http://www.cast.org/
  4. The IRIS Center (http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/) out of Vanderbilt Peabody College & Claremont Graduate University: free, online modules and case activities on a number of special education topics including 60 modules on accommodations and an additional 63 on differentiated instruction. This link takes you directly to the resource locator for the modules: http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/iris-resource-locator/
  5. The Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR) (http://www.parentcenterhub.org/) includes user-friendly summaries on a wide variety of topics in the field of special education, including topics Dr. Kyzar discussed on the podcast. Here is the link directly to the resources: http://www.parentcenterhub.org/resources/
  6. CPIR assumed all the old NICHCY resources, which were created under a grant-funded project (that ran to the end of its funding course as of Oct 2013) designed to provide information about special education to stakeholders in an accessible way; here is the link to the NICHCY warehouse and since IDEA has not yet been re-authorized, the resources here are still relatively current: http://www.parentcenterhub.org/nichcy-resources/
  7.  Christmas in Purgatory is aa well-known book in the intellectual disability community by Burton Blatt and Fred Kaplan. Here is a link to the photographic essay: http://www.disabilitymuseum.org/dhm/lib/catcard.html?id=1782
  8. Norman Kunc, who has cerebral palsy and speaks publicly on his experiences with a physical disability, has a powerful video in which he reflects on what his life could have been like if he had been sent to an institution as his parents were advised to do:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2OxpzPybT4

  9. On inclusion: Including Samuel is an engaging documentary: http://www.includingsamuel.com/film
  10. Lois Barrett’s 2013 article, “Seamless teaching: Navigating the inclusion spectrum” from Teaching Tolerance offers a good review of key special education ideas.
  11. Want to learn more about IDEA? Check out this video, “Celebrating 35 Years of IDEA” from the U.S. Department of Education:

Contact 

Dr. Kathleen Kyzar is an Assistant Professor of Early Childhood Education in the College of Education at Texas Christian University. She teaches courses on early childhood programming, family-school partnerships, and pedagogy for the young child and her research interests include family-professional partnerships and family support, family quality of life, and inclusive early childhood programming. You can view her scholarship on Google Scholar, ResearchGate, or contact her @KathleenKyzar.