Episode 15: Indigenous (Mis)Representations in U.S. History with Sarah Shear

In episode 15, Michael and Dan talk with Sarah Shear about Indigenous (Mis)Representations in U.S. History.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Here is a link to everything that Sarah Shear has written!  
  2. Zinn, H. (1980) A People’s History of America. New York: HarperCollins Publishers.
  3. Loewen, J. W. (1995). Lies my teacher told me: Everything your American history textbook got wrong. New York: New Press.
  4. Shear, S.B., Knowles, R.T., Soden, G., & Castro, A.J. (2015). Manifesting destiny: Re/presentations of Indigenous people in K-12 U.S. history curriculum. Theory & Research in Social Education, 43(1), 68-101.
  5. The quote Michael cited was “The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.”It was written by British novelist L.P. Hartley and opens his 1953 novel The Go-Between. There is also a movie.
  6. Dunbar-OrtizR., Gilio-Whitaker, D. (Upcoming). “All the Real Indians Died Off”: And 20 other myths about Native Americans. Boston, MA: Beacon Press.
  7. Dunbar-OrtizR. (2015). An indigenous people’s history to the United States: ReVisioning American history. Boston, MA: Beacon Press.
  8. The National Museum of the American Indian – Sarah mentioned this as a great resource with curricular materials
  9. Stanford History Education Group (SHEG). Battle of Little Bighorn lesson.
  10. Visions of Education Episode 10: C3 Frameworks with Kathy Swan

Contact

Sarah Shear is Assistant Professor of Social Studies Education at Penn State Altoona (which is fun to say…Altoona!). She can be contacted via email  – sbs5180@psu.edu – or you can follow (and chat with) on twitter – @SbShear!

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Episode 14: Equity Literacy with Paul Gorski

In episode 14, Michael and Dan discuss Equity Literacy with Paul Gorski.

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Gorski, P. (2008). The myth of the Culture of Poverty. Educational Leadership, 65(7),  32-36.
  2. Visions of Education Episode 11: Rethinking Black History with LaGarrett King
  3. Edchange.org (the organization Paul founded)
    1. A direct link to most of Paul’s publications

Contact

Paul C. Gorski is Associate Professor of Integrative Studies in New Century College at George Mason University. He founded the organization edchange.org and you can contact him on Twitter – @pgorski.

Episode 13: Creating Authentic Media with hosts Dan and Michael

In this extended conversation, Michael and Dan discuss creating authentic media for both educators and students. This episode is our longest, but it is chock full of ideas. Check out the resources below!

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Quick definition: Authentic media – media (we’ll be discussing digital) that is shared with a larger audience.
  2. Visions of Education Episode 11: Rethinking Black History with LaGarrett King
  3. ReadWriteThink’s The Nuts and Bolts of Podcasts (not discussed during the episode, but could be helpful).
  4. The StoryCorps app available on Google Play and iTunes.
  5. Podcasting Resources
    1. Voxer – a way connect asynchronously via text and voice
    2. Skype – we use to chat with our guests
    3. ECamm – we use this to record Skype
    4. Audacity – we use this to edit our discussions
    5. SoundCloud – we upload our podcast to this which the is then picked up by iTunes, Stitcher, and a few other places.
    6. Episode 31: Oral Histories in Education with Gabriel Abowd Damico
  6. Here are a few of the images that we discussed in this podcast

  7. Historical Digitally Altered Image Project. A blog post by Michael K. Milton
  8. Editing Digital Image Resources
    1. Photoshop
    2. Pixelmator
    3. Explain Everything
  9. A High School Teacher’s Experience with Keeping Pace During Snow Days. A blog post that Michael wrote about creating screencasts (with some resources and explanation).
  10. Video Creation Resources
    1. Screencast-o-matic
    2. Snagit
    3. MindOverMedia: Analyzing Contemporary Propaganda (www.mindovermedia.tv)
    4. Visions of Education Episode 7: Propaganda with Renee Hobbs
    5. “5 Educational Philosophies” by Prof. Krutka’s class: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3H0DbcDbIbs]
  11. Social Media Resources
    1. TodaysMeet
    2. The Enlightenment Meets Social Media. A blog post by Michael about his use of social media to teach about the Enlightenment.
    3. Rheingold, H. (2010). Attention, and Other 21st-Century Social Media LiteraciesEducause Review45(5), 14-24.
    4. Visions of Education Episode 4: Inside/Outside Sharing with Wes Fryer
    5. The (Industrial) Revolution Will be Twitterized. A blog post by Michael about using Twitter to look at the spreading of the Industrial Revolution.
    6. Dan’s social media lesson for his classes
    7. Krutka, D. G. (in press). Remixing current events: Navigating the transmedia terrain with young learners. Social Studies and the Young Learner.
  12. Websites/Blogs
    1. MichaelKMilton.com
    2. DanKrutka.wordpress.com
    3. Dan’s Educational Foundations class website
  13. Videoconferencing
    1. While #MysterySkype can take many forms, here’s a blog post about one way to do it.
    2. Krutka, D. G. & Carano, K. T. (2016). “As long as I see you on Facebook I know you are safe”: Social media experiences as humanizing pedagogy. In A. R. Crowe & A. Cuenca (Eds.), Rethinking social studies teacher education in the twenty-first century (pp. 207-222). Switzerland: Springer International.

Contact

Michael K. Milton and Dan Krutka are the hosts of this podcast! Our information can be found in the about section. Contact them at @VisionsOfEd or individually at @42ThinkDeep (Michael) and @DanKrutka (Dan).

 

Episode 12: Using Films Effectively with Jeremy Stoddard

In episode 12, Michael and Dan interview Jeremy Stoddard about effectively using film in the classroom (and talk about Godzilla).

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Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. You can find a list of Jeremy’s pubs HERE and his open access publications HERE.
  2. This article provides a fantastic and brief introduction to teaching effectively with film: Stoddard, J. (2014). Teaching thoughtfully with and about film. Social Education, 78(5), 220-224.
  3. Jeremy references this study: Marcus, A. S., & Stoddard, J. D. (2007). Tinsel town as teacher: Hollywood film in the high school classroom. The History Teacher, 40(3), 303-330.
  4. A great book on using film: Marcus, A., Metzger, S., Paxton, R., and Stoddard, J. (2010). Teaching history with film: Strategies for secondary social studies. New York: Routledge.
  5. Jeremy’s newest book should be out next year!: Stoddard, J., Marcus, A., and Hicks, D. (Eds.) (forthcoming, 2017). Teaching Difficult History through Film. New York: Routledge.
  6. Hobbs, R. (2006). Non‐optimal Uses of Video in the ClassroomLearning, Media and Technology31(1), 35-50.

Contact

Jeremy Stoddard is an Associate Professor of Education and Associated faculty in the  film and media studies program at the College of William & Mary. You can follow Jeremy on Twitter @Jeremy_Stoddard, find more of his research on his ResearchGate or his sites listed above, and learn more about his work on his William & Mary site.