Episode 133: Teaching Networked Activism with Marie Heath

Episode 133: Teaching Networked Activism with Marie Heath

In Episode 133, Dan and Michael chat with Dr. Marie Heath about her recent Social Education article that she let Dan also join in on titled, “Has Social Media Made it Easier to Effect Social Change?: Inquiring into Tactics for Change through Primary Sources.”

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Episode 133

Books, Articles and Other Amazing Resources

  1. Krutka, D. G. & Heath, M. K. (2019). Has Social Media Made it Easier to Effect Social Change?: Inquiring into Tactics for Change through Primary Sources. Social Education, 83(5), 269-274.
    1. Find primary source documents for this inquiry at tinyurl.com/TacticsForChange, and slides to teach the lesson at tinyurl.com/TacticsForChangeSlides.
  2. Dr. Heath has also written many other great article, including this one: Heath, M. K. (2018). What kind of (digital) citizen? A between-studies analysis of research and teaching for democracy. The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, 35(5), 342-356.
  3. Ten Questions for Young Changemakers from the Youth Participatory Politics Research Network at Harvard University
  4. Tufekci, Z. (2017). Twitter and tear gas: The power and fragility of networked protest. Yale University Press.
  5. Schroeder, S., Currin, E., Washington, E., Curcio, R., & Lundgren, L. (2019). “Like, Share, Comment,” and Learn: Transformative Learning in Online Anti-Trump Resistance Communities. Adult Education Quarterly.

Biography

Marie Heath, Ed.D. is an assistant professor of educational technology at Loyola University Maryland. Her research interests center inquiry on young people attending high-poverty, majority-minority public schools, technology use, and civic engagement in online and offline spaces. Prior to working in higher education, Dr. Heath taught secondary social studies in Baltimore County Public Schools. You tweet her at @mariekheath.

Editor

We would like to thank Zack Seitz of Wylie High School (TX) and the University of North Texas for his editing skills.

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