Episode 133: Teaching Networked Activism with Marie Heath

Episode 133: Teaching Networked Activism with Marie Heath

In Episode 133, Dan and Michael chat with Dr. Marie Heath about her recent Social Education article that she let Dan also join in on titled, “Has Social Media Made it Easier to Effect Social Change?: Inquiring into Tactics for Change through Primary Sources.”

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Episode 133

Books, Articles and Other Amazing Resources

  1. Krutka, D. G. & Heath, M. K. (2019). Has Social Media Made it Easier to Effect Social Change?: Inquiring into Tactics for Change through Primary Sources. Social Education, 83(5), 269-274.
    1. Find primary source documents for this inquiry at tinyurl.com/TacticsForChange, and slides to teach the lesson at tinyurl.com/TacticsForChangeSlides.
  2. Dr. Heath has also written many other great article, including this one: Heath, M. K. (2018). What kind of (digital) citizen? A between-studies analysis of research and teaching for democracy. The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, 35(5), 342-356.
  3. Ten Questions for Young Changemakers from the Youth Participatory Politics Research Network at Harvard University
  4. Tufekci, Z. (2017). Twitter and tear gas: The power and fragility of networked protest. Yale University Press.
  5. Schroeder, S., Currin, E., Washington, E., Curcio, R., & Lundgren, L. (2019). “Like, Share, Comment,” and Learn: Transformative Learning in Online Anti-Trump Resistance Communities. Adult Education Quarterly.

Biography

Marie Heath, Ed.D. is an assistant professor of educational technology at Loyola University Maryland. Her research interests center inquiry on young people attending high-poverty, majority-minority public schools, technology use, and civic engagement in online and offline spaces. Prior to working in higher education, Dr. Heath taught secondary social studies in Baltimore County Public Schools. You tweet her at @mariekheath.

Editor

We would like to thank Zack Seitz of Wylie High School (TX) and the University of North Texas for his editing skills.

Episode 123: Contained Risk-Taking When Teaching Controversial Issues with Judy Pace

In Episode 123, Dan and Michael talk with Dr. Judy Pace about her new article published in Theory & Research in Social Education, “Contained risk-taking: Preparing preservice teachers to teach controversial issues in three countries.”

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Episode 123- Contained risk-taking When Teaching Controversial Issues

Books, Articles and Other Amazing Resources

  1. Pace, J. L. (2019). Contained risk-taking: Preparing preservice teachers to teach controversial issues in three countries. Theory & Research in Social Education, 47(2), 228-260.
  2. Pace, J. L. (2017/18). Preparing teachers in a divided society: Lessons from Northern Ireland. Phi Delta Kappan, 99(4), 26-32.
  3. Buy her book!: Pace, J. L. (2015). The charged classroom: Predicaments and possibilities for democratic teaching. Routledge.
  4. There are various examples of educators and scholars using the Structured Academic Controversy (SAC) model and here is one: Nathan, E., & Lee, C. K. E. (2004). Using structured academic controversies in the social studies classroom. Teaching and Learning, 25(2), 171-188.

Biography

Dr. Judith L. Pace is an education professor who uses case studies, inquiry projects, and film to challenge students to explore multiple perspectives on issues of educational justice. She does qualitative research on classroom teaching and its sociocultural and political dynamics. Her current project examines how teacher educators prepare preservice teachers for teaching controversial issues in divided societies and politically turbulent times. Recent articles include “Contained risk-taking: preparing preservice teachers to teach controversial issues in three countries” and “Preparing teachers in a divided society: Lessons from Northern Ireland.” Her forthcoming book is titled Hard Questions: Learning to Teach Controversial Issues. Professor Pace earned her doctorate of education from Harvard University where she worked on school reform efforts at Project Zero. See full biography at the University of San Francisco site.

Episode 107: Taking Action in Social Studies Inquiries with Carly Muetterties

In this episode, Michael and Dan chat with Carly Muetterties of C3Teachers.org about dimension four of the C3 Inquiry Arc: Taking informed action. We played around with some other titles like, “Beyond the Letters to the Editor” and the Sondheim-inspired, “Finishing the Arc,’ however, we landed here to be more descriptive.

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Episode 107- Taking Informed Action

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Episode 98: Teaching Students to Speak with Confidence & Listen with Empathy with Molly Andolina & Hilary Conklin

In this episode, Dan and Michael chat with Molly Andolina and Hilary Conklin about their new research published in Theory and Research in Social Education titled, Speaking With Confidence and Listening With Empathy: The Impact of Project Soapbox on High School Students.

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Books, Articles and Other Amazing Resources Continue reading

Episode 97: Social Studies Journals

In episode 97, Dan and Michael picked 9 social studies journal and book series editors to participate in a session to find out what happens when editors stop being polite and start getting real…The Real World. This episode was recorded live before a studio audience at the 2018 College and University Faculty Assembly (CUFA) of the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) Annual Meeting.

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VoE97

Books, Articles and Other Amazing Resources Continue reading

Episode 96: Supporting Youth-led Action with Marti Tippens Murphy

In this episode, Dan and Michael chat with Marti Tippens Murphy about her new article in Social Education titled, “Youth in Front: Supporting Youth-Led Social Action.”

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Books, Articles and Other Amazing Resources

  1. Murphy, M. T. (2018). Youth in front: Supporting youth-led social action. Social Education, 82(5), 255-259.
  2. Facing History and Ourselves: https://www.facinghistory.org/
    1. Current events: includes, voting, elections and health of a democracy: https://www.facinghistory.org/educator-resources/current-events
    2. Eyes on the Prize (streaming video): https://www.facinghistory.org/books-borrowing/eyes-prize-americas-civil-rights-movement
  3. Learn more about Charlotta Bass: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlotta_Bass
  4. Learn more about Lynda Lowery and Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom: https://www.npr.org/2015/01/17/377197156/new-memoir-recalls-marching-in-selma-at-just-15
  5. Learn more about Danielle Allen and her Youth Participatory Politics Research Network 10 questions for youth changemakers: http://yppactionframe.fas.harvard.edu/files/actionframe/files/v3_final.pdf
  6. See more on the videos Marti mentioned on the Engage Memphis page: https://www.facinghistory.org/about-us/offices/memphis/engage-memphis
  7. Our editor, Zack Seitz was the lead author on an inquiry with Dan and Prentice Chandler on Voter ID laws in the same issue of Social Education: Seitz, R. Z., Krutka, D. G., & Chandler, P. T. (2018). Are voter ID laws democratic?: Teaching deliberation for informed citizens. Social Education, 82(5), 291-298.

Biography

Marti Tippens Murphy has served as the executive director of Facing History and Ourselves’ Memphis office since 2014 but her roots with the organization date back to 1997. Her love for history and passion for storytelling led her to the organization’s Los Angeles office after receiving a master of arts in journalism from California State University Northridge. Prior to that, she received her bachelor of arts in international relations from Rhodes College. Since returning to her hometown of Memphis, she’s led the Facing History Memphis team through multiple initiatives that aim to foster community, empower young people, and generate conversations about today’s equity and justice issues by looking through the lens of history.