Episode 137: Teaching Difficult Histories of Indian Residential Schools with Photographs with James Miles

In Episode 137, Dan and Michael chat with James Miles about his recent article in Theory & Research in Education titled, “Seeing and feeling difficult history: A case study of how Canadian students make sense of photographs of Indian Residential Schools.”

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Books, Articles and Other Amazing Resources

  1. Books, Articles and Other Amazing Resources
    1. Miles, J. (2019). Seeing and feeling difficult history: A case study of how Canadian students make sense of photographs of Indian Residential Schools. Theory & Research in Social Education, 47(4), 472-496.
    2. Episode 67: American Indians in Children’s Literature with Debbie Reese (double check this is the episode with the Carlisle School discussion)
      1. You can find many other episodes on Indigenous topics here: https://visionsofed.com/category/indigenous/
    3. Episode 53: Teaching Difficult Knowledge with Jim Garrett
    4. Critical Thinking Consortium: 

    https://tc2.ca/sourcedocs/picture-sets/strategies-for-investigating-pictures.html

    Biography

    James Miles is a PhD Candidate at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto. He was previously a social studies teacher in British Columbia for ten years. His dissertation research examines the teaching and learning of historical injustices in classrooms, museums and universities. He is also an assistant editor at Curriculum Inquiry. His research has been published by Theory and Research in Social Education, Historical Studies in Education and International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education.  You can find him on Twitter at @james__miles. 

    Editor

    We would like to thank Zack Seitz of Wylie High School (TX) and the University of North Texas for his editing skills.

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