Episode 77: Approaches to Teaching Race in the Social Studies Classroom with Christopher C. Martell & Kaylene M. Stevens

In episode 77, Michael & Dan chat with Christopher C. Martell & Kaylene M. Stevens about their recently published Theory and Research in Social Education article “Equity- and Tolerance-Oriented Teachers: Approaches to Teaching Race in the Social Studies Classroom”. In their work, they share best practices of teachers and discuss the differences between the equity and tolerance approach to teaching race.

Subscribe on iTunesSubscribe to Stitcher

visions of ed.jpg

Books, articles, lessons, and other amazing resources

  1. Martell, C. C. & Stevens, K. M. (2017). Equity- and tolerance-oriented teachers: Approaches to teaching race in the social studies classroom. Theory & Research in Social Education, 45(4), 489-516. (download article)
  2. Martell, C. C. & Stevens, K. M. (2017). Becoming a race-conscious social studies teacher: The influence of personal and professional experiences. The Social Studies, 108(6), 249-260. (download article )
  3. Martell, C. C. (2017). Approaches to teaching race in elementary social studies: A case study of preservice teachers. The Journal of Social Studies Research, 41(1), 75-87. (download article)
  4. Martell, C. C. (2016). Divergent views of race: Examining Whiteness in the U.S. history classroom. Social Studies Research and Practice, 11(1), 93-111. (download article)
  5. Martell, C. C. (2013). Race and histories: Examining culturally relevant teaching in the U.S. history classroom. Theory & Research in Social Education, 41(1), 65-88. (download article)
  6. Stevens, K. M. & Martell, C. C. (2016). An avenue for challenging sexism: Examining the high school sociology classroom. Journal of Social Science Education, 15(1), 63-73. (download article)

Biographies

 Dr. Kaylene M. Stevens is the Social Studies Department Chair at Framingham High School. She has been a Social Studies teacher at Framingham High School for twelve years where she also ran the new teacher program. At Boston University, she worked as a research assistant; her work specialized in teaching about race and using culturally relevant pedagogy in the Social Studies classroom. She completed her doctorate in 2016 from Boston University. Her dissertation research focuses on gender equity in the Social Studies classroom. She currently resides in Framingham with her husband and daughter.

Taken from her faculty bio at Boston University. For more, check out her page on Research Gate.

 

Dr. Christopher C. Martell’s work primarily focuses on social studies and teacher education. He currently teaches elementary and secondary social studies methods. He was a high school social studies teacher for eleven years in urban and suburban contexts. For most of his teaching career, he taught at Framingham High School, which is a racially and economically diverse urban school outside Boston with large immigrant populations from Brazil, Central America, and the Caribbean. As a teacher, he engaged in regular examinations of his own classroom practices through action research. Previously, Dr. Martell was an adjunct professor at BU and UMass Boston, where he taught courses on secondary social studies methods and teacher research, and a BU field supervisor at Chelsea High School.

Dr. Martell’s research has been published in numerous peer-review journals and books. He is also the editor of the recent book Social Studies Teacher Education: Critical Issues and Current Perspectives. His scholarship and professional interests center on teacher development across the career span, including preservice teacher preparation, inservice professional development, and practitioner inquiry. He is particularly interested in social studies teachers in urban and multicultural contexts, critical race theory, culturally relevant pedagogy, and historical inquiry. His recent research has examined the role of race and ethnicity and the use of inquiry in the social studies classroom.

Taken from his faculty bio at Boston University. For more information and links to his works, check out his webpage.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s